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Is weight a problem?

30 posts in this topic

Reading the specs on the KKs is really thought-provoking. The weight of the Big Bad 32 for example, is nearly a half ton, all sitting on 4 casters (Just a few square inches of contact with the floor).

Has this caused problems for any of you?

Do the casters get a flat spot if the KK is left in one place for an extended time?

Is it difficult to move the KK? (I'm thinking of storing it under the covered part of my patio, and moving it out to operate it. My patio is concrete with pavers on top.)

For those of you with wooden decks/porches... Does your KK leave dimples in the flooring?

Thanks in advance.

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I don't have a 32, but my  23" and 19" both roll around on our tiled flooring with no problem - yes, I have to put some muscle into it due to the weight, but manageable.  No flat spots in the casters, Dennis doesn't skimp on any aspect of these cookers.  He has used the highest quality materials down to the last detail.  You really should call Dennis and let him walk you through all of this and answer your questions

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Every floor/deck is different. Any chance you could post pics? As Cookie said, the kk's won't be the weak spot in any equation, including the castors, and I have yet to have any real issues moving mine, a 23".

Rob

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^ same experience here with my 23".   There just isn't anything about the KK design, materials or construction that leaves my OCD ways wanting :)

 

It truly is without peer.

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I have a 23" and a 19" tall. I will roll them under the cover of my outdoor kitchen when it rains. They are heavy, but very manageable to move.

I will say it here first, I have never heard anyone come on the forum to complain of a component failure. This includes wheels, fire boxes, gaskets and any other aspect that you can think of. Dennis just creates wonderful cooking instruments that are rock solid.

Not sure where you are in Texas, but I am in The Woodlands North of Houston and you are welcome to come by and take a look.

Benton

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23 and 32 here and I can move them. You need too lean into them to get them going (i need to hit the gym more) but once you get motion they are easy

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I've got a 32, I'm keeping her stationary so probably most at risk of flat spots on the wheels, however I've been on the forum for a while now and know one has ever complained about it in the past.as for moving the 32 and it's not too bad, but also check for slopes, if the 32 gets away from you and you are by yourself it gets scary! Once you get it moving on a flat surface you can walk it around with relative ease. Stopping and starting takes a little work though!

Oliver, In Singapore. Cobalt Blue 32

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Newtonian physics, ya'll - a body at rest tends to stay at rest, while a body in motion tends to stay in motion - it's called inertia. And guess what, it's proportional to the weight. (Sorry, the engineer in me had to be let out!) 

 

When I had my deck rebuilt several years ago, I picked out the spot where the grill was going to go (the POSK at that time) and had two things done - shortened the joist spam for extra support and that corner of the decking is ironwood, which doesn't burn. It will scorch, but not combust. While the KK 23" does weigh a bit more than the old grill, I haven't noticed any support problems. These are industrial grade casters, so they will never get flat spots. 

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One other thing to know if you're still wondering about casters on a big grill like the KK 32": even at a half ton, with four casters, each one has to support 250 lbs. It's not difficult to find high quality casters that can support twice that weight or more.

 

I have a KK 23â€, and can move it around on my back patio which is covered with pavers just fine, and I’m not a big guy at all.

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One other thing to know if you're still wondering about casters on a big grill like the KK 32": even at a half ton, with four casters, each one has to support 250 lbs. It's not difficult to find high quality casters that can support twice that weight or more.

 

I have a KK 23â€, and can move it around on my back patio which is covered with pavers just fine, and I’m not a big guy at all.

I agree with Wilbur, 250 lbs per caster is nothing at all. The quality casters that come on a KK can handle way way more then that.

Are we ready for question number #2.

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Wow, every time I see this thread title, I think of belt sizes.

 

In fact, with moderation one can lose weight and enjoy great barbecue. Like the brisket hash we had tonight from the unclaimed piece we set aside for Laurie's daughter.

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Wow, every time I see this thread title, I think of belt sizes.

In fact, with moderation one can lose weight and enjoy great barbecue. Like the brisket hash we had tonight from the unclaimed piece we set aside for Laurie's daughter.

Yes! This is the real danger with a KK... Tempting to cook more food than you'll ever need!!

Oliver, In Singapore. Cobalt Blue 32

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One of the cardinal rules here is that the second thing you buy after your KK is a new, bigger belt!!  :tongue8:

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I just ordered the Big 32 and as I understand it there are 4 lifting straps/ropes w/loops on them.  Are they designed to be used with poles (2x4's) run between them so strong people could be on the end of each pole?  I plan on removing the lid and taking out everything that moves to reduce the weight to 480 pounds.

All questions and responses appreciated :-)

 

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I am lining up muscle for the moving day since my muscle has long since gone with the wind from injuries.

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14 minutes ago, FotonDrv said:

I just ordered the Big 32 and as I understand it there are 4 lifting straps/ropes w/loops on them.  Are they designed to be used with poles (2x4's) run between them so strong people could be on the end of each pole?  I plan on removing the lid and taking out everything that moves to reduce the weight to 480 pounds.

All questions and responses appreciated :-)

 

When removing the lid, be EXTREMELY careful where and how you set it down. You don't want to crush the lip. 

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I was thinking about setting it on a flat 1/8" X 2 ft X 4 ft steel plate and/or table top with a blanket under it.  Think that will work?  On the steel plate I would be able to get fingers under the lid on the long axis to lift it off the plate.  I can probably come up with a strong bench to do the same thing.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, FotonDrv said:

I was thinking about setting it on a flat 1/8" X 2 ft X 4 ft steel plate and/or table top with a blanket under it.  Think that will work?  On the steel plate I would be able to get fingers under the lid on the long axis to lift it off the plate.  I can probably come up with a strong bench to do the same thing.

 

 

Yes, sounds like a good plan. Just make sure it comes down even on all sides so you aren't compressing one spot of the lip before the others. 

You should email Dennis to get him to upgrade you to "Owner" on this forum. 

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I had a landscaper move my 32" when it arrived using a fork lift (well, it was more of an all purpose machine that they put forks on) and we laid down plywood to get it from the driveway to the yard to the new patio.  Not sure if that option is available to you, but it helped a lot - otherwise definitely strip off the lid / whatever gear you can to bring the weight down.  She's a beast, but once she's settled in you can move it around as needed by leaning into it.

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5 hours ago, DBQ said:

I had a landscaper move my 32" when it arrived using a fork lift (well, it was more of an all purpose machine that they put forks on) and we laid down plywood to get it from the driveway to the yard to the new patio.  Not sure if that option is available to you, but it helped a lot - otherwise definitely strip off the lid / whatever gear you can to bring the weight down.  She's a beast, but once she's settled in you can move it around as needed by leaning into it.

How thick was the plywood??

I do not have the space to get equipment to the final resting place so rolling on its casters and lifting it is the name of the game here.  I am hoping that it can go down these 48" wide stairs, either carried down or rolled down with a plywood cover on the stairs.  It is 8 ft from the top of the stairs to the bottom which mean one sheet of plywood will cover it, literally.

 

 

 

 

ShortStairs.JPG

Edited by FotonDrv
added text

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