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Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/16/2018 in all areas

  1. Finally finished off a side table for the KK. It’s not quite the quality of Dennis teak work though. I had some leftover jarrah slabs from a buffet table I made. I sanded this down and filled the imperfections. I nice satin varnish bought out the red and pinks in the jarrah slabs. The legs are old jarrah power posts. These had aged badly so I had to cut it back by a few mm. The jarrah was a reddish brown. Again that was varnished. These post are old jarrah and were super heavy. Jarrah is a hard word and working with it can be hard due to the weight and hardness. I love the colour though. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    5 points
  2. Sygygies that’s a cool looking grilling basket and that fish looks pretty tasty. Here’s a pic of a marlyn we caught a few years back. It’s not a sword fish but this guy weighed 760 lbs.
    4 points
  3. Weber Grilling Basket KK Charcoal Basket Splitter A match made in heaven: The smaller Weber grilling basket, and a KK charcoal basket splitter. Swordfish is expensive; we splurged by using some of our dwindling supply of KK coffee lump charcoal. The basket splitter pays for itself, in economic use of good charcoal. Moroccan charmoula: 2 tsp cumin, 3 garlic cloves, 1 tsp sea salt, 1/4 finely chopped cilantro, 3 TB finely chopped parsley, 2 tsp sweet paprika, 1/4 tsp black pepper, pinch Marash or other hot pepper, juice of one lemon or rinsed pulp of a preserved lemon, 2 TB olive oil. Pound together with a mortar and pestle, spread on fish. Marinate. Grill.
    4 points
  4. Well done Australia against a bunch of show ponys lol never seen people fall over that much lol .. got some nice baby backs ..gave them some purple Crack and ipa on the bottom. . And some summer peach on top. . On they go over cherry. . I mixed up some ginger ,garlic ,plum sauce and some vegemite. . .looking good. . Threw on some corn. .and gave them a baste. . Made up a mayo apple cider sauce .. To go with my apple fennel slaw.ribs are looking good . .slaw is ready ..ready to rest. . Ready to cut. .and sliced .. . Plated with the slaw and corn. . Great effort australia Outback kamado Bar and Grill
    3 points
  5. Stop teasing me vegemite yum Outback kamado Bar and Grill
    2 points
  6. Top job lol. Outback kamado Bar and Grill
    1 point
  7. How was the Vegemite with the recipe (taste), was it a hassle mixing it in.....looks good and yes the frogs got lucky
    1 point
  8. Nice job, almost looks like walnut but, I assume it's not indigenous to Austrailia
    1 point
  9. I'm just back from a terrific two weeks in Morocco, keen on new ideas for using my KK. Tangia is a specialty of Marrakech. The pot shown has a two quart volume, but is intended for only a half kilo of meat. The idea is that others will handle the pot, not knowing the contents, but trusting that the pot can be placed at an angle. For example, the top photo shows tangias being reheated over charcoal for serving, at stall 97 in Jemaa el-Fnaa square in the Marrakech medina. A typical recipe that fits nicely, if one isn't going to tip the pot shown (two quarts capacity), is: 4 cloves crushed garlic, 1/4 preserved lemon seeded and finely chopped, 1/2 tsp ginger, 1/2 tsp ground cumin, 1/4 tsp turmeric, pinch saffron, 1 Tb butter, 1 1/2 Tb olive oil, salt and pepper, 800g beef (chuck roast from the end that becomes rib eye?), 1/2 bunch tied cilantro, 3/4 cup water. Mix all but the cilantro and water, marinate in the fridge overnight (I vacuum packed), then add the rest and cook all day till melting and sauce reduced. One will surely need to adjust the water to one's technique. Tangia is traditionally made by men. The idea is that they own the pot (or they buy a new one for $2). A butcher that provides the beef or lamb will also include the rest of the recipe, in a matter of seconds. One then takes the pot to a bathhouse, where for 10 cents the person handling the bathhouse fire will also tend these pots in the ashes for the day. This is in the same spirit as the communal ovens I saw everywhere (and where I baked the bread from one of my classes), except at a lower temperature. My KK was still 200 F from last night's chicken. It was easy to add more lump charcoal in a pile against one side, set the guru to 275 F for now (to turn down once the pot heats), and leave this for tonight's dinner. In the footsteps of Dennis our spiritual leader, who teaches us by example the confidence to embrace life and see everything through to its logical conclusion, I'm signed up for pottery classes nearby in Concord, CA. If one isn't going to tip a tangia, one would prefer a modified form to use in a KK. There are many other shapes I'd need to commission if I didn't learn how to make them. Earthenware in the KK is a great way to invoke the holy trinity that birthed our species of food, clay, and fire. After learning partially glazed earthenware I hope to move to New Mexico mica clay, which is close to indestructible. This is the same clay as La Chamba pots, or Moroccan Souss tagines. The Pueblo people of New Mexico perfected this form of pottery, and the clay is available now.
    1 point
  10. Looks great. Too bad about the soccer. Wow those grates look like new Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    1 point
  11. Love the colour of your table.
    1 point
  12. Very good looking table, great job.
    1 point
  13. NICE job Tangles looks great!
    1 point
  14. Hey Dave that’s some gooood looking chow!
    1 point
  15. Looks pretty good Tangles fits well Outback kamado Bar and Grill
    1 point
  16. Looks great. I have to buys one of those tubs from red dot Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  17. This site has opened my eyes to a whole different level of cooking! Recipes I never dreamed of making or techniques I never knew existed.
    1 point
  18. I bet they did enjoy the thighs, everything looks sooooo delicioius. When my beans are ready I eat them everyday until I've had my fill. It takes about 2 weeks.
    1 point
  19. I cooked for this week's card game the night before, which made my morning of the game much easier, plus provided dinner for wife and I fresh off the cooker. Marinaded chicken thighs in Asian sauce for 24 hours, then cooked direct on main grate for around ninety minutes or so at 300. Our dinner sides were fresh corn and pasta with pesto. The fellas enjoyed the thighs the next day...
    1 point
  20. If that was my tortoise I’d give it a hand and stick a drawing pin on its head, give it a fighting chance lol
    1 point
  21. I should soak mine in some PBW soon. Gave them a lick. Definitely not Vegemite.
    1 point
  22. Almost looks like those grates were smeared with Vegemite. Couldn't you just lick them clean?
    1 point
  23. I'm growing a lot of kale this year. I read that the nutrient value reduces relatively quickly after picking so I thought I would do the greenhouse to smoothie maker to tummy in minutes test. Whizzed up a pile of kale, a pear and a lime. It was really tasty for something that is so good for you! That has broken my duck and I am now going to make the most of my crop by having a smoothie at least every other day.
    1 point
  24. Hope they don’t Disintegrate overnight! LOL looking forward to the finished product
    1 point
  25. Gigantic 4-6 per lb. count shrimp and fresh zucchini. Seared on lowest level. Other side not shown was leftover black eyed peas mixed with silver queen corn. I used Cajun seasoning on the shrimp, and it may sound weird, but I used brisket rub on the zucchini and after pulling from the fire, a sprinkling of purple crack. It turned out delicious! Wife raved, which pleased me greatly.
    1 point
  26. @Chanly1983 - this one’s for you. Just so happened to have two 72 hours doughballs in the fridge (recipe at the link posted above). Here is my configuration today. Repurposed Grillgrates from a long dead gasser are my IR deflector. Round baking steel up high. Ready to cook Pizza #1: I highly recommend Mike’s Hot Honey as a drizzle: Pizza #2:
    1 point
  27. ...and the answer is paella on the BB32 whilst the 23 is cooking a roadkill, just in case the guests are extra hungry. Sautéing chook chunks with veg. Add more veg, tomatoes, Calasparra rice, and saffron rosemary broth. The roadkill is almost done while finishing with a bit of socarrat. Nailed it!
    1 point
  28. Hmmm...what have we here? Full arsenal in action today...
    1 point
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