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DennisLinkletter

National & Regional Cuisine

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:smt041

Will have to ponder some personal entries. Might duke it out with ckreef over best shrimp & grits recipe! LOL

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I'll get something posted up eventually. Almost everything around me is fried but I'm just not willing to deep fry in the KK. 

 

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Yay!  What fun.  I am separated from my grills at the moment but will join the fray on my return.  In the meantime I am enjoying raw seafood Italian style and marvelling at how hot their peperoncino sauces are.  It shows what a mash up food culture is - the Japanese do not have the copyright on sushi and we Africans do not have a monopoly on heat and spice.  

Looking forward to the first food posts here!

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Nigerian Jollof Rice with Chicken and Dodo

This is a typical Yoruba party dish in Nigeria.  I cooked as much of it as I could in the KK and I am very pleased to report that it tasted great, just like home.

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A quick run through the component parts.

Jollof rice at parties is typically cooked over a wood fire so I simulated the effect by smoking some washed, raw rice before cooking it in my donabe rice cooker.   I fried some finely chopped onions in goose fat, fried the smoked rice and then cooked the rice with half water and half smooth tomato sauce.  The tomato sauce can be cooked with any spices you like but make sure it has a lot of chilli in - always use a bit more than you think you can stand and it might be close to being right.   The rice was fluffy and tasty.  A bit more smoke (hoping to have pellets for my Dennis smoker soon) and a bit more salt next time.  

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Smothered some chicken in cooked down onion, tomato and sweet peppers and added some chllis for good measure.  At a Nigerian party the chicken would have been deep fried before going into the sauce.  Next time I will brown on the KK before the sauce stage. 

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If you have read this far I am guessing it is because you want to know how I came to be cooking an extinct bird.  Dodo is what we call fried plantain and has nowt to do with the other dodos.  The ripeness of the plantain is important.  Green ones won't cut it.  The riper they are, the sweeter they taste.  The Ivoriennes go so far as to get them to a soft, almost rotting stage before deep frying and slathering in hot sauce as a road side snack.  They call it aloco.  We don't go that far.  Here are some semi soft plantains.

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Here they are, chopped party style.  I guess they go further if cubed this way.

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When deep fried they absorb a fair bit of fat but come out very tasty.  My father prefers them cut on the slant with less surface area exposed to the fat.

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I was going to give you a triumphant view of my new rotisserie "air fryer" but the less said about that debacle the better.  The picture at the start of this thread shows the cubed dodo, deep fried in my IDK.  I will continue my experiments with the roti in secret.  

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That chicken and rice look tasty smothered with the red peppers. Did you kick it up a notch? Or was it a safe, maybe a less imposing spice added besides the chilli. Nice combo but I can't taste it no matter how many times I lick the screen

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54 minutes ago, Tyrus said:

That chicken and rice look tasty smothered with the red peppers. Did you kick it up a notch? Or was it a safe, maybe a less imposing spice added besides the chilli. Nice combo but I can't taste it no matter how many times I lick the screen

Hey Tyrus, it was safe.  Not too hot.  This time.  Just want to lull you and your screen into a false sense of security.  

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24 minutes ago, tekobo said:

Hey Tyrus, it was safe.  Not too hot.  This time.  Just want to lull you and your screen into a false sense of security.  

So...I've learned that @tekobo's heat scale is a bit different from the typical American's. "Safe" probably means "only 3rd degree burns".

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26 minutes ago, Pequod said:

So...I've learned that @tekobo's heat scale is a bit different from the typical American's. "Safe" probably means "only 3rd degree burns".

Yes, it is!! 

I thought that I had posted this already, but who knows what I did before?? So, here's my 1st contribution of my "home style" - South Carolina low country (aka Charleston) Shrimp & Grits. The recipe is one from a dear friend that I've known since high school, with some added notes by me.

Mary Carr’s Fabulous Shrimp & Grits recipe

Shrimp (for 6-8 servings)

2lbs medium (25 count) shrimp (peeled/de-veined)
1 Tb butter
1 cup minced bell pepper (a mix of red, green, yellow, orange)
1 tsp Sriracha Hot Chili Sauce


Saute peppers in butter until soft, add the shrimp and chili sauce and cook until the shrimp are just pink. (Cook shrimp sous vide w/o peppers, just butter poach with seasoning. Put peppers in gravy along with Sriracha.)
Place shrimp on top of cheese grits and smother in the red-eye gravy. Garnish with chopped chives and/or parsley.

Red-eye Gravy w/mushrooms
1 Tbl butter
8 oz country style (salt cured) ham (Andouille and Spanish Chorizo work, too)
½ cup Shitake mushrooms
¼ cup minced onion
½ cup Madeira
½ cup strong brewed coffee (french/italian roast or espresso)
1 Tbl cornstarch
6 oz V-8 juice (spicy) (Can use Bloody Mary mix, just be mindfull of the extra salt)
1 Tbl minced thyme


Melt butter in large pan over high heat, sauté ham until beginning to brown. Add the mushrooms and onion, continue to brown. Pour in the Madeira, followed by the coffee. Simmer until the liquid is reduced by ½ (about 15 minutes). Dissolve the cornstarch in the V-8 juice and whisk into the gravy. Return to boil and allow to thicken. Add thyme to finish the gravy.


Cheese Grits
1 stick butter
2 cups water
2 cups half & half
1 cup grits (it is essential that these are stone-ground white grits – my choice is Carolina Plantation Stone Ground Grits - http://www.carolinaplantationrice.com)
1 cup sharp cheddar cheese (Vermont white cheddar is also good)
salt (be generous in salting the water for the grits, similar to pasta).

Melt butter in large pot. Add the half & half, water and salt. Bring to a boil. Slowly add the grits. Reduce heat to low and simmer until done (texture should be similar to polenta). Add the cheese and stir until melted.

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Now that sounds interesting,,is there an occasion it suits you to present or would you say it's an all around meal. White wine although it has the Madeira. Sounds like it has some Portuguese influence

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I'm not familiar with any Portuguese influence in the SC coastal area, but who knows; it was a serious melting pot of African and UK (a good Scots-Irish influence), with a soupçon of Spanish and French.

Shrimp & grits is not what I'd call an "everyday" meal, but not exactly reserved for very special occasions either. Just say, whenever you feel like it!

Edited by tony b
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What an awesome cook, tekobo. :smt060

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Beautiful, I only wish I could have tasted that masterpiece. :wynar:

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I am ignoring all references to third degree burns and hope that you do try your version of this dish sometime.  It is really cooked "to taste" and is very tasty.  Smoked rice is definitely something I want to explore more.

As for grits... I have never tried them but my local Texan friend has some, I think.  Will see if she is willing to share in return for a taste of @tony b's recipe.  Failing that, an American friend with a card took me to the Costco in Southampton a few weeks ago.  It seemed to be an outpost of America so I expect they sell grits there.

Thanks @MacKenzie.  I was resisting an early lunch but now that I have seen the picture again I think I might go for the last of the leftovers...now!

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@tony b  come now you know what they say - I guess it really didn't happen.

 

Try again - this time use a camera - LOL 

 

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@tekobo - not sure what a UK Costco might stock, so maybe they do carry grits over there?? But, if all else fails, maybe you can score one of those killer Prime bone-in/cowboy ribeyes for $12.99/lb for their Father's Day special! 

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