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KK787

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Everything posted by KK787

  1. Forgot to mention a great French Chef technique …….. after pulling your bird from the refrigerator, put ice packs on the breast meat while the rest of the bird comes to room temp. This will ensure your dark meat finishes in the 185 - 190 range as the breast hits the 170s while maintaining a consistent skin doneness all around. . The dark meat connective tissue at renders at about 180. Anything below that temp the dark meat could be a bit tough.
  2. You were ahead of your time Tony!! It’s really cool watching Kickstarter projects come to fruition. In my Perfect Prime Prime Rib rotisserie post, the Meater saved the day. I estimated the cook to be around 4+ hours. I used all four probes and an hour into the cook, Meater estimated the cook was going to be done in 1.5 hours - an hour and a half early. I was in disbelief. So I pulled out the thermopen and confirmed the temps bingo, the roast finished an hour and a half early. The KK with hits huge heat retention just cooks things faster. But without the Meater, I would have had an overdone roast. Thanks Tony - have a great holiday season.
  3. Thanks!! Give it a try and have a great holiday season.
  4. After a lot of research, trial and error, great talks with Dennis, I’ve unlocked some secrets to the perfect rotisserie Turkey. 1. Brine: 1 gal of water. 1/2 cup of kosher salt. 1/4 cup brown sugar. That’s it. Nothing more. Top chefs I’ve talked to, that’s all they use and all that is needed. Brine for 24 hours. Double recipe if needed. 2. Baking Powder: It must NOT contain aluminum. Pat dry the bird after brining. Use a fine mesh sieve and dust the entire bird. This works great for crisping up the skin and also works great on chicken wings too 👍. 3. Air Dry: Air dry the bird 24 hours uncovered in the refrigerator. Bring to room temp about an hour before the fire. 4. Drainage: Use a Jacard meat tenderizer or knife to make small slits in the skin in fatty areas to drain rendered fat. This will allow rendered fat to drain, fall into the hot coals and smoke which will give your bird absolutely incredible flavor. 5. Truss: Truss the bird and Install the skewer directly through the center of bird. Use the skewer point and a hammer to pierce the cartilage making sure it is evenly placed through the center. 6. Fire: 375-400 at the dome. Preheat at least one hour in cold temps. Add 2 cherry wood chunks to the fire about an hour into the cook - gives nice subtle hint of smoke and adds nice color to the bird. 7. BIG SECRET-Heat deflector: This is a game changer I discovered. Use a Weber stainless steel perforated roasting pan as your heat deflector. The square one fits perfectly between the handles on a 23 Ultimate. See picture below. This deflects the heat, but most importantly, allows renderings from the bird to drain through and reach the fire which adds incredible flavor to the bird. Better yet, the pan blocks all flareups from reaching the bird. 8. Baste Recipe: Roast the bird for 1 hour. Prepare a baste consisting of 1 cup olive oil, one stick of butter, chop thyme, rosemary, chive, sage - add to oil. Purée’ a shallot, and mash two garlic cloves - add to oil. Salt and pepper to taste. Heat on low and combine. 9. Basting Mop: Take a small bunch of thyme, rosemary, and sage stalks and tie them up super tight with twine twice at the end making a mop. Stir and saturate in the basting oil. Remove basting oil from heat. 10. Baste: Baste the bird every 20-30 minutes after the first hour. The basting oil will drip into the hot fire again creating incredible flavor. The oil will also help crisp up the skin. 11. Temp: 170-175 breast and 185 dark meat. Generally, white meat finishes first. As the white meat approaches its finish temp, I stop the rotisserie so the dark meat is facing the fire and I hold this until the dark meat hits the indicated temps. Do this when the white meat is about 165+ for about 15 minutes. The connective tissues in dark meat will not render until about 180-185. If you go above to 190, no big deal. The higher the better. 12. Scorch: Turn the rotisserie back on. Bring the fire up to 500 and finish for 5 minutes. This will give the bird its final color and crisp it up. 13. Remove the bird. Let rest for 15-45 minutes - I find that 30+ works best. Carve and enjoy. 14. Meater Probe: These work fantastic with no wires and really changes the rotisserie game. You get internal temps and external temps directly at the pint of the cook and the software interface is really nice. The estimated cook times get you close in terms of internal temps but use a Thermopen to spot check around the bird to fine tune. This is the very best turkey all of my guests including a professional chef has ever tasted. My neighbors texted me and I found them hovering around the grill waiting for samples 😂. Been asked to do a demo for a local William Sanoma store. It’s incredibly flavorful throughout. The white meat is moist without being watery or salty and has incredible grilled flavor. The dark meat is succulent - absolutely delicious. The key is the perforated heat deflector - it is truly a game changer - Enjoy!
  5. KK787

    Perfect Brisket

    From what I have experienced and read, when fat burns on a solid surface at a lower temp than an actual flame, it’s sticky and mucky and may produce a burnt smell profile. When fat hits hot flames it produces a white smoke that actually enhances the taste of the meat. Many offset pit masters are tossing their soft fat scraps into their pits to achieve this effect. It’s sort like the taste of burnt scraps on a griddle vs the flame taste of a burger done on open flame. The open flame flavor is achieved by fat drippings hitting the open hot flames. This works especially well when doing rotisserie chickens and turkeys on the kk. Try my Weber perforated pan technique - it prevents flareups while allowing the rendered fat to hit the hot flames which produces a beautiful white/blue smoke that really enhances the flavor of the meat.
  6. KK787

    Perfect Brisket

    Accidentally pasted post - disregard
  7. KK787

    Perfect Brisket

    I’ve cooked other things and have applied lessons learned to this cook as well. The 15 hour wet oven rest worked great. Harry Soo’s method of wood use - excellent - have used it for many cooks - much easier and way better smoke than the kettle method used by 99% of the people here as stated in another post. The use of a little water keeps my drip pan from burning fat which is a flavor I did not desire to have for this particular cook. Two or three spritzes during a 9 hour cook helps prevent an overdone bark - what’s the big woop? I do what is needed for a particular cook. My next brisket, I will try my weber heat deflector trick which will allow rendered fat to reach the fire and see what taste profile that yields. I chuckle when I here 99% of the people here don’t do that. There are so many new techniques being discovered out there. I certainly hope the 99% don’t miss out.
  8. KK787

    Perfect Brisket

    Thanks for your reply’s. Mad Scientist BBQ did the white smoke research based on his own testing and secrets shared from other pit masters he works with. Dennis also agrees their findings. Other cooks that use Komodo style grills (smoking dad bbq) have done blind tests where they found spritzing and a water pan improved their results. Adding water also keeps my drip pan from burning. I've been pleased with the results with beef ribs and pork butts. For chicken and turkeys, I use a square perforated Weber roasting pan as a heat deflector. It fits perfectly between the coal basket handles on a 23. It deflects enough heat and allows the rendered fat to reach the fire which gives incredible flavor to poultry. The meat was a Costco Prime and yes, 5 pounds was trimmed off a 15 pound brisket.
  9. After about a years worth of research, advice from Dennis, I smoked my first prime brisket on a 23 Ultimate. The results were outstanding. Rub - 2 to 1 Pepper to salt. Before mixing, I subtracted 1 TBS of salt. Rub applied liberally. Then lightly sprinkled with Lawerys followed by garlic powder. Dry brined in the refrigerator uncovered for 24 hrs. Fuel - Jealous Devil, hickory and cherry wood chunks at the bottom. Harry Soo’s method. Drip pan with water and spritzed with apple cider/water combo 3 to 4 times. Rumor has it it’s not needed, latest scientific info says it essential. Once eye burning smoke cleared to white smoke (10 minutes) placed cold brisket onto cold grill. Turned Blue in 1hr. Not all white smoke is bad - latest finding. 15lb brisket trimmed down to 10lb, smoked 9 hours at 230 Meater probe temp increasing to 250. FireBoard controlled the fan. Meater used to monitor the meat. Pulled at 190. Wrapped in tallow/butcher paper. Rest 15 hours in a wet oven/cooler. Done.
  10. Looking for some advice on smoking my first brisket. I’ve concentrated my attention on Harry Soo and Smoking Dad BBQ. Harry dominates competitions on the Weber SmokeyMountain while SD has good info on the Komodo style grills. Harry Soo …… I’ve set my KK up using his fire basket method for pork butts. I’ve achieved awesome blue smoke for several hours with no kettle pots or foil pouches. His method works fantastic. Here is a link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOctn85Y-n Harry also recommends using 275 with a simple heat deflector. I know the WSM doesn’t produce as much radiant heat but what temp do you recommend for briskets? SD BBQ technique with his Kamado Joe uses two deflector plates in order to run a hotter fire for better smoke at 300. It seems to keep the bottom of the brisket from getting tough. He also uses a technique where he puts wood chips in through the ash tray door so he doesn’t have to disassembled his system mid cook. Question: 1. Use 2 deflectors or 1? If 1, position it it high or low? I have the double drip pan, round drip pan, and pizza stone that can be used. 2. Temp for best results? 3. I have a newer Kk with the rear gas burner insert door panel that I can put wood chips or chunks in to augment the smoke with out moving everything off. Has anyone tried this technique? Thanks for your help👍👍 SD BBQ technique with his Kamado Joe uses two deflector plates in order to run a hotter fire for better smoke at 300. It seems to keep the bottom of the brisket from getting tough. He also uses a technique where he puts wood chips in through the ash tray door so he doesn’t have to disassembled his system mid cook. Question: 1. Use 2 deflectors or 1? If 1, position it it high or low? I have the double drip pan, round drip pan, and pizza stone that can be used. 2. Temp for best results? 3. I have a newer Kk with the rear has insert door panel that I can put wood chips or chunks in to augment the smoke with out moving everything off. Have you tried this or know anyone who has? Harry Soo …… I’ve set my KK up using his fire basket method for pork butts. I’ve achieved awesome blue smoke for several hours with no kettle pots or foil pouches. His method works fantastic. Here is Harry also recommends using 275 with a simple heat deflector. I know the WSM doesn’t produce as much radiant heat but what do you recommend for briskets? SD BBQ technique with his Kamado Joe uses two deflector plates in order to run a hotter fire for better smoke at 300. It seems to keep the bottom of the brisket from getting tough. He also uses a technique where he puts wood chips in through the ash tray door so he doesn’t have to disassembled his system mid cook. Hi Dennis ……. Looking for some advice on smoking my first brisket. I’ve concentrated my attention on Harry Soo and Smoking Dad BBQ. Harry dominates competitions on the Weber SmokeyMountain while SD has good info on the Komodo style grills. Harry Soo …… I’ve set my KK up using his fire basket method for pork butts. I’ve achieved awesome blue smoke for several hours with no kettle pots or foil pouches. His method works Harry also recommends using 275 with a simple heat deflector. I know the WSM doesn’t produce as much radiant heat but what do you recommend for briskets? SD BBQ technique with his Kamado Joe uses two deflector plates in order to run a hotter fire for better smoke at 300. It seems to keep the bottom of the brisket from getting tough. He also uses a technique where he puts wood chips in through the ash tray door so he doesn’t have to disassembled his system mid cook. Question: 1. Use 2 deflectors or 1? If 1, position it it high or low? I have the double drip pan, round drip pan, and pizza stone that can be used. 2. Temp for best results? 3. I have a newer Kk with the rear has insert door panel that I can put wood chips or chunks in to augment the smoke with out moving everything off. Have you tried this or know anyone who has? Thanks Dennis - appreciate your advice. Question: 1. Use 2 deflectors or 1? If 1, position it it high or low? I have the double drip pan, round drip pan, and pizza stone that can be used. 2. Temp for best results? 3. I have a newer Kk with the rear has insert door panel that I can put wood chips or chunks in to augment the smoke with out moving everything off. Have you tried this or know anyone who has? Thanks Dennis - appreciate your advice.
  11. KK787

    Perfect Pizza

    Stadlermade makes a small steel wood fired pizza oven that looks good. A traditional oven is nice but as stated above, they take a long time and lots of fuel to bring up to temp. The KK works great at these temps - no issues to report.
  12. KK787

    Perfect Pizza

    Thanks for the reply!! I used Caputo Blue for the pizzas above. I will crank up the KK to 800 and give it a try👍👍
  13. KK787

    Perfect Pizza

    Thank You for your reply and …….. that is one beautiful oven you have👍👍. Stadlermade.com, their pizza calculator is an excellent tool and his YouTube videos are excellent too. The three day ferment is the easiest dough process I've tried and the results were great. I’ve tried many flours but the best so far is Caputo Tipo 00 Pizzeria flour. As far as temps, I found that 650 - 700 for the 23 Ultimate is a good sweet spot. I’ve tried hotter temps 700 to 800 but I find that the bottom crust burns a bit to fast. This can probably be mitigated by using a heat deflector below the pizza stone. It takes about an hour to get everything heated up and ready to go. 10 minutes before baking the pie, I push the pizza stone back, open the grate door, and toss in wood chunks. Once the white smoke turns to heavy blue, I begin prepping the pies and by the time they are in, you get nice wood baked flavor. Thanks for your reply!!
  14. KK787

    Perfect Pizza

    Been working on it for awhile, but I’ve found a method that produces perfect Neapolitan pizza dough and it’s super easy. The result, perfect thin pizza with a light airy crust that is delicious. Stadlermade.com is a fantastic pizza site. They have an excellent pizza dough calculator that figures the exact ingredients needed for different style pizzas and the number of pizzas you want to make. They also have great YouTube videos. For this cook, I tried the Cold Fermentation process. The dough takes 5 minutes to make with fresh yeast. Popped the dough into the fridge for 3 days, made three dough balls and let them proof at room temp for four hours, then prepare then off to the KK. Enjoy 👍 K K. The results were fantastic. Easy and incredibly good 👍
  15. Also note, the cook times in the stall are not accurate and Meater sends you a note during the setup process that reflects this. Once out of the stall completely, the finish times are accurate.
  16. Looks good! What do you use for smoke generation? Foil pouch, Harry Soo's method, cast iron pot, etc?
  17. After months of research and practice with many cooks on lower cuts of meat, I found the perfect method for prime rib that does not involve Sous Vide but gives similar results. That is, perfectly cooked meat edge to edge - no brown bands, excellent crust. Here is the link: https://blog.thermoworks.com/beef/science-of-perfect-prime-rib-roast/ The final cook was performed on a 11 pound, 5 bone, dry aged, Prime, prime rib. I could not afford to screw up this cook! I used a drip pan and the rotisserie basket which the roast fit perfectly. Plus there was no skewer hole in the meat. Anyway, it came out great. Excellent bark, the center was medium rare pink throughout. The ends were medium. The meat was perfect and everyone was extremely pleased. The technique above was the key. The big surprise was the length of time. According to the charts, it was going to be a 4 to 5 hour cook at 225-250. The MEATER probes saved the day - I used all four in this roast. At 1:30 into the cook, it said the roast would be done in an hour!! I was in disbelief! So, I put my faith in the Meater, called everyone, moved Easter dinner up, and pressed on. The roast was done in 2:45 total. I foiled wrapped it loosely in a metal pan and let it rest for roughly 45 minutes. It was still really warm when served. It was absolutely excellent. My wife was supposed to take more pictures buy in the chaos of the day, she/we forgot. Again, the technique above was the key to success. I used straight charcoal, no wood. Just salt, pepper and garlic powder. Was going to baste with oil, butter thyme and rosemary the last two hours, but it cooked to fast! And in retrospect, I am glad I did not. The flavor was perfect with the seasoning as is.
  18. I’ve made pulled pork on my Camp Chef smoker and 23 Ultimate KK and they were pretty good. Yesterday I tried Smoking Dad BBQ's Kamado style pulled pork in my KK, the results were fantastic. Incredible bark, super moist meat without being greasy or wet and full of Smokey flavor the likes I’ve never experienced on the CS or KK. Here is a link to his video: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=smoking+dad+bbq&qft=+filterui%3avideoage-lt43200&view=detail&mid=DFBF2B49473021E24E16DFBF2B49473021E24E16&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=%2Fvideos%2Fsearch%3F%26q%3Dsmoking%2Bdad%2Bbbq%26qft%3D%2Bfilterui%3Avideoage-lt43200%26FORM%3DVRFLTR As Rum and Cook says, you don’t need all the contraptions that other Kamado style grills require in the KK and he is absolutely correct. All I did was use my foil lined double wall drip pan as a heat deflector on the lower rack. I used award winning Harry Soo's technique for setting up his Weber Smokey Mountain for long cooks - worked fantastic. Perfect light blue smoke for hours. I forgot to shut down the grill after pulling the meat and even after 13 hours, the smoke was perfect. No foil wrapped wood or cast iron pots. Just charcoal and wood specifically placed and lit. I followed the temps used in the Smoking Dad BBQ link above. I used my Fireboard controller to run the Pit Bull fan and my Meater Block to monitor the cooks in both pork butts. A split screen on my iPad made monitoring both apps easy. To set the correct temps, I first set the dome temp to 270. I then referenced the Fireboard probe reading and set that temp in the Fireboard app. I closed the KK bottom vent, opened the fan vent about 1/2 way, and that controlled the temps well. The sharp spikes in the graph is where I opened the KK for spraying. Please not, the iPad picture is a snapshot and does not reflect when the finishing temps were raised to 330. Special thanks to Smoking Dads BBQ, Rum and Cook, and Harry Soo for your excellent How To videos. Really appreciate your hard work and time all to make my cooks better.
  19. And add baking powder after the brine and before placing in the fridge?
  20. I have one of those Dennis - thanks for the advice! Will give it a try. I tired roasting the bird directly after the wet brine and it was way to moist and watery. So brine, jaccard, air dry in the refrigerator over night then cook?
  21. Beautiful machine! I was looking the exact same one this morning. Does it over dry your chicken meat in an effort to get crispy skin?. If you are doing ribeye steaks, mow much meat on each side do you end up slicing off - 1/8”?
  22. What kind of Dry Ager and size do you have?
  23. Ok ……. This worked. Brined the whole bird for 3 hours - 1 gal water, 1/2 cup kosher salt, 1/4 cup brown sugar. Patted dry with some moister left. Salt and peppered. Then I took a small sieve, put a heaping teaspoon of aluminum free baking powder in it carefully held it over the bird, then tapped with my finger which dusted the bird perfectly. I placed the bird on a wire rack pan and let air dry overnight. Cooked the bird at 350 in the rotisserie basket for about an hour and a half using the Meater probes. Pulled the probes when the breast was 175. Cranked up the heat to 500+ and seared the skin until golden brown - about 5-8 minutes. Came out perfect. Moist meat and excellent crispy skin. Do not tent the bird because this will soften the skin. Let it rest uncovered.
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