Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/17/2024 in all areas

  1. Beautiful day here in the Boston area so I decided to make a batch of chicken breasts. I’ve been dealing with some blood pressure issues lately so I haven’t been doing as much of the good stuff as I had in the past. I’m just trying to teach myself moderation lol But tomorrow I’ll be making an exception and making a nice porterhouse 😁 Anyways todays cooking and a little BB32 eye candy too 😉 My lady friend wanted to try some chicken with just salt and pepper, they don’t look too appetizing but it’s what she wanted so it’s what I made for her. Anyways, happy cooking everyone !!!!! PS, the sourdough is a whole grain sourdough. I’m almost offended that everyone likes it better than my typical extra tangy loafs. Don’t tell them but I do too lol I use KA Super 10 and the KA Harvest Grains to replace 100 grams of the APF
    10 points
  2. Early anniversary dinner, screw going out. 8 times out of ten I’m thinking I could have made something better at home. Only thing is the cleanup, I’m exhausted! Those oysters were monstrous and delicious. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    9 points
  3. Couple of racks of baby back pork ribs. 225F for first 2hrs. 275F last 2 hrs. Pulled glazed and wrapped in foil. KK smoke worked great and used my rechargeable pump . Yeah, someone will see in this cook setup, I used the stones for indirect deflectors. They are far enough away from firebox on lower grate, I have not noticed any difference compared to foil and pan. Will do some beef ribs and a 7hr cook and try the foil and pan at 300F and see if there is any difference. IMG_1986.mov
    8 points
  4. Rotisserie lamb, dirty rice, Mediterranean salad, tadziiki
    8 points
  5. Hope the Easter Bunny was good to all y'all! 🐰 Easter lamb dinner here - tenderloins, direct @ 325F. Plated, with rosemary & garlic roasted potatoes and haloumi "fries" (cheese coated in crumbs and baked), side salad, and nice Merlot.
    8 points
  6. Peruvian spice rub tri-tip baby carrots air fryer potatoes chimmichuri
    8 points
  7. haven't used my kk in months.. i can still hit my temps without apps 😅
    8 points
  8. After more than 3 years out in the weather, I finally got around to sanding and refinishing my side tables with Tung oil. Good as new!
    7 points
  9. 7 points
  10. My parents are visiting us and the kids from interstate. Whipped up @Troble’s Polla a la Brasa on the Roti, with pickles, coleslaw, roasted smashed potatoes, salad and green sauce. A big hit as always! IMG_8326.MOV
    7 points
  11. smoked dry rub ribs from the hybrid aged pork rack. i ate a few pieces and took a nap..😴
    7 points
  12. Happy Easter All! Yummy day of eating here. White sprouting broccoli and blue cheese tart. Japanese black cod. First time cooking it on the KK. Lost the skin but the flesh was much moister than it normally is when cooked under the grill indoors. Cooking one steak well done for our guest. Apple pie chaser.
    7 points
  13. Most of the time, if I’m doing “2-zone” in the 23, I’m fudging indirect by grilling on the main grate with a full basket below and with or without a sheet of foil on the middle grate. Then remove those grates and go low for the sear. Not a true 2-zone, but distance squared works pretty well. Turns out I used to do rocket science. I wish the rocket folks would think a bit more, and the grilling folks think a bit less.
    7 points
  14. They do clean up really nice don't they
    7 points
  15. I was inspired by @remi cook of my Peruvian polo a la brass so decided to make it tonight. Never disappoints @tony bi ate at a good Peruvian place yesterday and struck up a conversation with the chef who asked me where I sourced ingredients in San Diego…told him I grow my aji Amarillo and we got to discussing the Peruvian green sauce…the real stuff used a herb called Huacatay and I purchase a plant yesterday https://thegrowers-exchange.com/products/huacatay?variant=40098478522449&currency=USD&utm_medium=product_sync&utm_source=google&utm_content=sag_organic&utm_campaign=sag_organic&utm_campaign=gs-2019-12-19&utm_source=google&utm_medium=smart_campaign&gad_source=1&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIj-iu7pTDhQMV0MzCBB1mJQ-HEAQYASABEgLDnfD_BwE I am going to make it my mission to nail down the authentic version of this sauce this year. The jalapeño substitute is fine but the real deal is so much better. This chef used jarred Huacatay but he asked me to bring him the real stuff along with my fresh aji Amarillo which I’ve already started growing this week….stay tuned for updates but I’m gonna figure this out this year….going to Peru for two week over Christmas so I will get this “Peruvian crack” recipe nailed down this year
    6 points
  16. i used my rib rack for the first time today. i've had it sitting in my shed since i bought the 19. i don't think it was made for beef ribs, but i couldn't get the single bones to stand up without falling over. i also used wood chunks right on the coals. still works great this way and less hassle.. used only half a basket of charcoal and for almost 8 hours i only burned through half that. what a charcoal miser..
    6 points
  17. So I did the jerk chicken cook yesterday. The smoke pot filled with Pimento wood, Pimento leaves and allspice berries worked great! I did the marinade as mentioned and I think I need to kick up the seasoning and flavor a bit. Otherwise the texture and cook went very well in spite of the very crappy weather here yesterday!!! I look forward to continuing to work on the marinade and seasoning. Cheers, IMG_4468.mov
    6 points
  18. Turkey Breast top grate 325F pulled at 158F wrapped in foil and butter. This time tried stone deflectors on lower grate for indirect cook and seemed to work fine as they are still far from fire box and top grate. Also used KK cold smoker which worked great with rechargeable pump. Deep crust came from mayo binder under rub. Not very thick however, they cooked very fast and crust did not set well. Perhaps a lower temp and longer would have worked better.
    6 points
  19. dinner from last night. didn't bother putting on a plate just ate off the baking sheet..
    6 points
  20. @MacKenzie yep, it is Celsius:-) you can actually see it was close to that temperature (590° Celsius) when I did the photo. Highest I got on the Gozney Dome was 640° Celsius so far. To achieve this it needs to be fueled with wood though. Propane gets it to something like 400° Celsius "only". This things burns like a hellfire... 👹 @David Chang old Dome. I am very satisfied with it. Attached some more pictures of earlier pizza sessions last year. It's really fun cooking pizza with the oven.
    5 points
  21. We raise our own beef, pork & chicken, so some sort of meat is almost always on the menu. We also live in the middle of nowhere and love pizza, so I'm usually making that once a week, along with baking all sorts of breads. With that has come an accumulation of assorted outdoor cooking appliances that includes two gas grills, two vertical smokers, an offset smoker, a pig roaster, a BBQ pit, and a cold smoke shack. While sitting out back enjoying my morning coffee the other day, I was suddenly reminded of an old Frank Lloyd Wright quote that sticks in my head; that "many wealthy people are little more than janitors of their possessions", and while far from being wealthy, let's just say that I had an epiphany at that moment, as a comfortably retired janitor. I had already primed wife number last that we might be able to include some sort of pizza oven in a planned addition and backyard makeover this year, but the outdoor kitchen part of the project was growing out of control. Her sister had purchased one of those egg things, that I immediately dismissed as ridiculously small and impractical, but she enjoys cooking with it, so I sensed a bit of sibling rivalry a brewin'. Our assorted cooking gear was mostly older stuff that was not particularly efficient, nor especially fun to cook with, so I was already secretly planning on replacing a smoker or three, as well as a roaster, but here's the thing. A value line offset smoker for my brisket, by the time I mod it out and upgrade some particulars, was gonna run close to a grand, and if I wanted something much larger or more efficient, I was very quickly going to be looking at spending several thousand dollars for something that was still gonna run me ragged when I smoke. The small pig roaster is an older eye sore, but it works, and here again, any sort of acceptable replacement is more good money after bad in terms of still taking up space for a fairly singular use appliance. The big ass gas grill has pretty much always been nothing special beyond being a convenient way to cook outside of the kitchen, 'cuz I mean, what's so special about gas cooked meal, the grill marks? And then there's the pizza oven. Building it is within my skill set, but the older I get, the more stingy I've been getting with my time. The alternative of course is to just buy one, but here again, anything that'll do a decent job on a 16" pie is going to start at another thousand dollars and up, so where does this leave me? "Look honey, that new Old Country offset smoker is gonna be two grand with crating and shipping from Texas" (we're in Delaware) "And a decent pizza oven is gonna be another $1,000, for something that's gonna look kinda cheap and just sits on a counter". "Carl's Hot Box pig roaster is another $1,500 by the time we add all of the doodads and have it shipped," (a friend makes and sells them) "And a decent sized ceramic Kamado Joe is three grand, plus almost another $1,000 for a rotisserie, a pizza cooking attachment, and assorted geegaws. All of that for grill space that can only hold one brisket or a single large pizza." "That's over $8,500 to basically do little more than we can do already, but wait!" "We (this is part of the psychological warfare, where I turn 'Me' into 'We') can buy this here Komodo Kamado Big Bad that can cook twice as much food with a whole lot less hassle, AND you get to pick from all of these amazing colors and finishes, AND it'll save us over a thousand dollars!". "Best of all, it's a whole lot nicer than that silly egg thing that your sister bought at Lowes. You know, the one that's exactly like a million others on patios all over the country..." "The garden club girls are gonna die!" "I can sell all of this other crap while we're at it." "How can we not buy this?!" Yeah, this is not a luxe item, this is just common sense (or at least that's how I'm trying to sell it). lol Not a want, but a need. lol Anywho, looking forward to ordering one up later this spring, but first I have to build a place to put it. :)
    5 points
  22. Decided to cook up some pork roasts, i slice them and vac seal for later use. Great for sandwiches and salads. 250 for 2 and a half hours or so, until internal temp is 140 or 145. Then a nice long rest before slicing, they stay really moist and tender.
    5 points
  23. made a pizza for lunch with spicy salsiccia. i'm not a fan of the donut pillow cornicione but i need to remember cold dough doesn't want to stretch as much...
    5 points
  24. Recent loaf of whole grain sourdough, don’t laugh but I made that for my dentist. They made me some spaghetti sauce that was absolutely amazing!!!!!
    5 points
  25. Top rack, even with lip, not upper rack. 235 till 165 then wrap and pull off at 202 degrees. But at last count there are 3427 different ways to cook brisket 😁
    5 points
  26. ☘️🍀🌈 Not doing anything super special here. A couple of Irish Ales. Bangers & mashed for dinner. A nice Jameson's after dinner.
    5 points
  27. Don’t think you understand. It’s not a question of whether you’re actively making bread. It’s a question of…do you have this toy, just in case. 😈 Here is today’s loaf of 40% fresh milled white sonora which will be going to my wife’s co-worker. She happens to have prolific chickens, so we’ve been the recipients of excess eggs. Quid pro quo.
    4 points
  28. I'm hoping to rotisserie roast a whole hog for a family gathering this summer, but since I'd never done one I decided to do a practice pig. I ordered a 70 to 80 lb one from a local meat shop last week with the plan to pick it up Wednesday afternoon, dry brine it overnight, and have it roasting by 10 am yesterday (Thursday). My brother and I went to pick it up and things went a bit awry: not only was the pig 93 lbs - it was also frozen solid. Evidently, the supplier didn't have any pigs ready to slaughter in the sight range I'd requested, so they sent the closest thing they had. The front legs were frozen straight out by the head and the hind legs were straight out from the back of the pig so it didn't fit in any of the coolers we had available so we loaded it in the back of my pickup truck and carried it home. It was wrapped up tight in plastic; when we got it home, we suck it in a couple of industrial garbage bags (one over the front end and the other over the back end tapped the open ends of the bags together with duct tape, and lugged it upstairs and dumped it in the bathtub on top of a tarp, then filled the tub with cold water. My brother got to my house before 8 am Thursday morning and the pig was thawed so we lugged it back downstairs and opened up the plastic to discover that the pig has been butterflied - very good if you're wanting to smoke it in a smoker or open pit, but not for spit roasting. The spine had even been split open on the inside so it would lay nice and flat. We cleaned it up and washed it, then seasoned the inside and got it on the spit the best we could, tying it on with heavy twine. Neither of us is good with knots so we tied a lot. Got the motor mounted on the spit and the spit on the tripods. It was very damp here so I started two chimneys of lump charcoal to establish a good bed of coals while my brother applied soy sauce to the pig's skin. When the charcoal was burning good, I dumped it in the fire pit, added hickory, and we started up the rotisserie at around 9:15 am (about the same time a couple of cousins showed up to help). Most of the pig was done by 4:45 pm or so, so we stopped the rotisserie and focused on getting heat on the areas that weren't quite to temperature. We took it away from the fire about 5:15 pm and let the pig rest while I hunted for a 10 mm wrench to remove the spine clamp; the wrench had evidently wandered off on is own adventure after I'd used it that morning. Due to the pig being butterflied, it flopped around a lot and because of that and shrinkage, we had to stop and add additional twine to secure the pig to the spit. Also, with the legs tied up stretched out in front and behind the pig, the pig was wider than the firepit so the legs didn't cook very well. We also burned a few patches of skin. I had invited friends and family to come by and get pork to go; the general consensus was that it was very tasty except for the burnt patches of skin and the undercooked legs. I fire up the big grill to finish up the legs after most everyone has left. So, the verdict: I think things went pretty well considering it was my first attempt; I certainly learned a lot. A lot of the issues we encountered were due to the pig being frozen and butterflied; I have some ideas for handling those issues if they reoccur. I think we can handle the undercooked legs by bringing the hind legs up under the pig to shorten up the total length instead of leaving them stretched out behind. Oh - we also had a major grease fire when the oil in the propane deep fryer my brother was using to fry french fries at lunch caught fire, but that's another story. We also had a few rain events and some pretty strong wind gusts, plus a tornado warning after the cook was done. PXL_20240411_150948483.TS.mp4 PXL_20240411_172236138.TS.mp4 PXL_20240411_183900220.TS.mp4
    4 points
  29. I had a severe craving for a nice sandwich yesterday. The scratch that cured the itch... roast beast, turkey, hard salami, swiss cheese, onions, tomatoes, olive tapenade, oil and vinegar, on pumpernickel. A nice cucumber tomato salad on the side.
    4 points
  30. i don't understand pan pizza, but here is an attempt at it. it did not taste like pizza hut..
    4 points
  31. Hey @tekobo your post made me laugh….I too have a hard time comprehending @Syzygies post and find myself reading them over so I can hopefully understand and learn from them!!!! Both of your post made me think of many topics for discussion. I’ll comment on a few of them. Freezing masa / tamale dough. I tried an experiment once where I froze a small quantity of prepared masa for tamales……my results at the time were NOT favorable. If my memory serves me right it seems like the texture was funky / not like it was before and I never went that way and scrapped that idea. Freezing tortillas, I do this often with our family tortilla recipe which uses flour and cornmeal and they are fine this way…not as good as fresh but still very good. I have not done this with homemade masa tortillas but am intrigued to try this knowing you’ve had success with this. Tamales - Fully made tamales freeze well. Our standard family recipe calls for 7lbs of masa and we yield about 100-120 tamales from this. We will vacuum seal these and if you steam them when reheating they are almost as fresh as when coming out of the original kettle. Masa is pretty forgiving so I think there is a pretty good range of viscosity that will still yield good tamales. Many years ago (mid 1970’s) my father went to Mexico to visit family. During the visit we learned a trick that we believe makes our masa lighter / or more fluffy. I will cook a cup of rice in microwave with a higher ratio of water to rice then typical. We also add some beef boullion to the water. Once done we add a little more water and blend this and add this straight into the masa. Don’t tell my family I shared this secret with you!!! I also have a recipe for taking fresh sweet corn, cooking and making this into a masa of sorts for a sweet tamale…..still working on this one but just shows you wide ranges of corn for making masa. Tamale fillings - Yes you can put pretty much anything you want for filling in these. We have done a number of different fillings, but it always seems like the family favorite is pork that is pan fried and cooked in homemade mole sauce. One funny story is that many years ago I was watching an episode of one of Anthony Bourdain’s travel food shows where he is somewhere in Mexico. In the episode (that is somewhat tequila fueled) Anthony is sampling an Iguana tamale….with a tail sticking out of the end of it…..he leans into the camera and quietly says……this is the worst tamale I have ever eaten!!!! Buying me a McLauren Spider……..Ha Ha. Many years ago we had a school / church auction in which we put up a Mexican dinner for a party of 6 that ended up in the voice auction. I was a little apprehensive ……thinking that it would fetch maybe $250 - $500….. I was shocked that we sold it for $1,200 and because it did so well they immediately asked if I would do it again….we ended up selling 2 more at $1,200 so we raised $3,600 for the kids….so to speak! Needless to say I felt very much under pressure to cook a much larger menu than I was originally thinking. No I could not cook up a meal worthy of a McLauren Spider……but hey if you want to send me one I will not turn you down!!! On a bit of a high today, as we had a video call to meet our first grandchild as my daughter lives out of state! Looking forward to meeting her soon!!! All the best, Paul
    3 points
  32. Did some drumsticks on the KK this evening and I bought an order of fries from a fast food place when I was in town this afternoon. Heated the fries up in the air fryer. They were good but not as good as when fresh from the fast food place but better than frozen fries. This one is for you, Tony.
    3 points
  33. I ended up just brining the ham for two days instead of curing it. Sliced it up for soup and sandwiches. I requested the butcher leave the ham whole which was a mistake. Next time I'll have him quarter it to make the process a bit more manageable. Trying to work with a 20lb ham isn't all that easy.
    3 points
  34. Sorry... I just saw that the picture I shared before actually did not show the temperature... Here you go
    3 points
  35. humm, i'm not sure what breed it is but it's called bangelow sweet pork from australia. this is the only chilled pork rack of this size i can find. everything else is frozen or from china. so i decided to crack her open today. broke her down to skin, rib-eye, and bone rack. it basically tastes like dry aged pork with the taste of beef tallow. it's very good .. .
    3 points
  36. As I’ve been telling the young engineers I work with, you know it’s time to retire when you walk around an Air & Space museum and keep thinking, “I remember working on that…” 😳
    3 points
  37. You couldn't resist, could you? If I had done rocket science I would tell everyone about it too!
    3 points
  38. Pizza cooked in a Gozney Dome at 625 degrees... Celsius:)
    3 points
  39. @C6Bill Your formula yields a handsome and tasty loaf, but alas, the tang still eludes me . . .
    3 points
  40. Thanks for posting this link Paul. I have used a cast iron smoke pot for years but rarely make the dough ring to seal the top. I have guiltily watched the smoke leaking out of the top, realising that my unsealed pot wasn't fulfilling @Syzygies design intent of pushing the smoke down into the coals to burn off the "bad stuff". I ordered my own little pot and am just waiting for a good opportunity to smoke something. Kudos also to @Cheesehead_Griller as I think it was he who originally suggested this style of pot. I will report back once I have tried it out myself.
    3 points
  41. P.S. Welcome to the right side of the tracks.
    3 points
  42. Bringing back an old thread. I’ve never really made Jerk Chicken and after a trip to Jamaica last month it inspired me to work on making Jerk. In reading through some of the threads here I decided to start with an approach / recipe by @tony b. I’ve picked up some Walkerswood paste and plan to add water and dark rum. I’ve also ordered some pimento wood, leaves and berries (aka allspice) and plan to put into the smoker pot. I’m planning to target 350F indirect until mostly cooked thru and then finishing over direct coal to add char / crust. I’m also thinking of another approach / version in which I would add marinade & SV cook & then freeze so that I can easily finish on a direct grill for a remote Canada fishing trip. I’m looking for some input and suggestions for both of these planned cooks. Also, planning to cook bone in skin on chicken thighs. Ya Mon!
    2 points
  43. I recently redid my spreadsheets to match current practice. First is "worksheet", second goes on wall while I work. It doesn't really matter if you're consistent and don't care about comparing notes with others, but I account for board flour, shrinkage, to nail actual hydration as if this were a chemistry lab experiment. I've seen other accomplished bakers who ignore the starter hydration, for example. Their effective hydration is a local fantasy. We grind some of our flour. We've been buying white from Acme Bread, famed in Bay area. They have Guisto's make this for them, but likely a different blend than one can buy elsewhere. I learned to accelerate the hydrolyse for each step by 60 seconds in a vacuum sealer chamber. This makes an obvious difference for pasta dough, and I believe a difference here too. I rediscovered "bassinage" where one kneads the dough at a comfortable hydration, then adds water at the end using Chad Robertson bowl folds. I like to knead a long rope, fold it over and twist, knead again to a long rope... My theory here is that one does better with a kneading technique that doesn't cause the bran to cut through the developing gluten. We use the KK in summer to avoid heating the house, and a convection oven in winter. I used to worry about filling the oven with ample steam. We now swear by the Challenger Bread Pan.
    2 points
  44. You can! I got to the point where I could see my ship on the map en route to Southampton docks, past my bit of sea, so I cycled out to the sea front near my house in pitch darkness to see if I could see the ship with my KKs go by. I couldn't but it was all part of the fun. Get Dennis' folk to give you the ship's details and you can track it online.
    2 points
  45. Thanks @tony b! Wife and kids are excited as well. They are already thinking up names for the grill.
    2 points
  46. Yes! I never thought I would think about a grill every single day, but I do! It's cobalt blue tile. All I know is it has an ETA of end of March. I'm guessing that's when it hits the dock in the US. Not sure how long customs and overland shipping take from there. If I could track that ship I would! Every time I talk about it my wife just smiles and shakes her head. I'm like a 52 year old kid waiting on Christmas.
    2 points
  47. You need a bread proofer. Or you're a hack. 😏 You mill your own flour, right? RIGHT??? The above, rude exchange with @Pequod reminded me of this thread. Just spent a lovely 15 minutes or so re-reading all the old posts. Really must get back on the bread making horse. And yes, I do own a Brod and Taylor bread proofer in my home in the UK (thanks to @P and the KK shopping channel) but cannot bring myself to spring for another for the place in Italy. Will try the warming bowl in my Kenwood Chef when I am next there. I have visions of turning into @Syzygies, duplicating kit for his two homes before finally consolidating into one and having to find homes for it all! I really must try @C6Bill's recipe - you seem to get such reliable results. And I still have not got onto @Syzygies's spelt loaf. All in good time.
    2 points
  48. @wrandyr Sourdough 200 g Sourdough starter 330 g Water, (90°F to 110°F) (start with 275 g) 500 g Flour (425 White and 25 Whole Wheat to start) 11 g Sugar 12 g Salt 50 g yellow cornmeal, for coating the paper Stir together all of the ingredients except the cornmeal and salt in a large bowl. starting with 450 grams of the flour and 275 grams water. Let the shaggy mess rest for 20 minutes covered. Then add remaining 50 grams of flour 55 grams of water and salt. Let rest an hour then stretch and fold. Stretch and fold two hours after that. Then refrigerate overnight in a sealed container. The next morning let the dough come up to room temp for a half hour and stretch and fold one more time. Then place loaf in a floured Banneton bowl, covered for 4 hours. It should become nice and puffy. Gently poke your index finger into the top of the loaf, if the indentation remains, your bread is ready to bake Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 450°F Put parchment paper on a cookie sheet, and cut to shape for dutch oven with tabs for handles. Put the cornmeal on the paper and gently roll the loaf on to the sheet and score the loaf however you like. Immediately put it in the oven. Put loaf in oven and turn temp down to 435. Bake the bread for 35 minutes and remove lid, then cook an additional 15 minutes until the crust is golden brown and the loaf sounds hollow when you tap it on the bottom. The interior temperature of the bread should register about 205°F on a digital thermometer. Turn the oven off, crack the door open, and allow the bread to remain inside for 10 additional minutes; this helps the crust crisp. Remove the bread from the oven and cool it on a rack. And wipe any additional cornmeal off the bottom.
    2 points
  49. My oven has a bread proof setting, works great 😊
    2 points
  50. Took advantage of better temps today and did some chicken drumsticks. Plated with pickled onion, potatoes and carrots. Interior.
    2 points
×
×
  • Create New...