Web Analytics Made Easy -
StatCounter
Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble

johnnymnemonic

Owners
  • Posts

    215
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    14

Everything posted by johnnymnemonic

  1. I usually cook my briskets at 275. I did a couple of chuck roasts a few days ago at 275 with my billows. I had my KK top vent open between 1/4 and 1/2 turn. I had all bottom vents closed other than the billows being in the guru port. I had the little yellow billows damper open about halfway. I had the basket splitter set up so that charcoal was only on the right side and the food on the left. I have a 42 not a 32. But this cook was very consistent for me. I light my fire with a looftlighter. I light about a baseball sized amount of charcoal. At the point that I light the fire, I already have the smokeX2 and the billows running. after lighting the baseball sized amount of charcoal, I close the lid and let the grill warm up to temp prior to putting the food on. in this case I didn't wait all the way until the grate thermometer was reading 275 - it was close though and the thick white smoke had subsided letting me know we were getting nice blue smoke. (about 30 mins or so). The Billows kept it pegged within 5 degrees of 275 for the 3 or 4 hours these took to cook. One of my first cooks with my KK was brisket and if I were doing a brisket I might set up the grill the same as I did then. I might put foil across most of the lower grate and use the full firebox just to be sure that I had enough fuel so that no reloading was necessary. I think putting a few pieces of wood on the bottom of your firebox and then putting coal on top is a good approach. I have done this with the cook in the pictures in this post and with the pork cook above and I got plenty of smoke flavor and it was not acrid tasting in the food. About the fire meandering around in the firebox - don't overthink it. In a previous cook I noted that since the oxygen from the billows is going to be coming mostly on the right side of the grill, you still probably want to shade your brisket over to the left hand side of the KK when you're using the billows b/c the fire is going to tend to be closer to where the air is coming in. I'd light a baseball sized amount of charcoal on the right center of your firebox and go ahead and have your billows going. Put the food over to the left center of the KK 32 once the temp reaches close to your target. Just use foil on the lower grate and a drip pan underneath your food as your deflectors. Happy cooking.
  2. Pork butts with mustard binder and DAS BBQ rub from a home town joint. Pork loin roasts with DAS BBQ high octane sauce with espresso infusion as binder with Jansal Valley coffee chili rub. Both came out good. I slightly overlooked the loins. Flavor was awesome. This batch of pork BBQ from the shoulder butts had great bark but I think I prefer wrapping and going a little lower temp to pull than 203F. A little too much fat rendered out of this batch and wasn’t quite as moist as I usually want. Flavor and bark were incredible though. Chewy. Bacon-y. Smelled like Heaven. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. I learned this with my green egg a long time ago. If you burn it off, then the ceramics / refractory cement / whatever you've got becomes like a sponge for moisture. With my egg in the humidity I would notice on high temp cooks that water was boiling out of my ceramics and one time there was a gas explosion out from under the paint that took a chunk of paint off. From that point forward I quit burning the egg at high temps to burn stuff off and let that patina build up. I no longer had any issue with excess moisture in the ceramics. I also keep it covered. Anyway I have commuted all of this to the KK - I will burn at high tems to cook a pizza but I will not leave it going for hours b/c if you do have moisture buildup it has to go somewhere. Sure we have extra grout to fix venting, etc but don't force it to happen!
  4. Mine that arrived in November did not have an air pump, I can assure you. (Maybe I was one of the very last ones shipped without an air pump - no worries). And luckily I had one from an old aquarium that is adjustable.
  5. My kit didn’t include a curved tube and a guru adapter. I only have the straight tube. Also am using my own air pump; that was not included in my kit either. Definitely a great review. Nice work. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  6. Answered my own question by zooming in on the photos. Nice work using the basket splitter metal cover pieces with a baking pan turned upside down as the backstop. Otb. Mcjudsten config #2 Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  7. Smoked 2 chuck roasts. Did them all the way to 210 degrees before opening the kk. While finishing them in foil I began grilling. First some peppers. Potatoes wrapped in foil, brushed with olive oil, kosher salt in pouch. Grilled the burgers and 2 portobello caps. When potatoes were pliable in pouch, removed from pouch and direct grilled. Brushing with olive oil and turning often till skin was crisp. Sprinkled potatoes with kosher salt. My wife started plating before I could show all finished products together for the grilled items. Chuck roast is meat candy. Turned out awesome. It is cooling in bags now and I will vac seal it later tonight. Burgers shrooms peppers and potatoes all stellar. Cool thing about this much room in your 42 is you can warm up the dish you are bringing the food in on. I had plenty of room to just Chuck it in the grill for a couple minutes. Boy do I love my 42. Beverage: founders porter in a frosty mug. Awesome choice for the weather we are having. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  8. What did you use to create this setup in your 42? Very interested. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. If you ever questioned the moisture retention of a KK I have proof. Condensation dripping out the bottom of my KK about 2 hrs into my cook of a couple of chuck roasts at 275 using the billows. Will post addl pics in the misc everyday cooks section later. Anyway see that puddle? Water dripping out of the kk. I have drip pans solidly under the food so I know it isn’t fat. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  10. I'm still very glad I got the 42. When you grill on a 42 with all that room to spare it is so nice. The versatility of the 42 is amazing with the grates split into 3 sections, basket splitter comes standard, etc. I'm just going to have to get a smaller KK one day. In the mean time I'll still keep the egg around. I'm doing two cooks this weekend. Another batch of rotisserie chicken and some burgers. Probably going to cook them one after the other tomorrow. roti first then pop in the lower grate and grill.
  11. @Durangutansorry for the late reply. expounding on the uneven temps from left to right unsure. If you look at the attached photo, this is the cook I am talking about. Notice that I'm probing the grate kind of on the left center, and I'm probing a pork butt that is on the left. This picture is right before I took them off. The pork butt I was probing on the left was at 203. The ones on the right were more like 208-210. I was worried that they were too overdone but they were awesome. They were falling apart so much when I was taking them off that I had to use gloves just to get them off the grill. Although I am unsure, I will guess the differential was 10-15 degrees. In other words where the probe sat left of center was 225 and the actual temp on the right side was 235-240. That is just a guess. And this would probably tend to shift throughout the cook as the fire moves around in the box. But anyway - If I do this same cook again, I might probe both sides of the grill next time just for science. Was a heat deflector in use? For this cook, I used a whole firebox of charcoal. I covered the lower grate with aluminum foil (except the edges). And then underneath you can see those drip pans. Most KK users do not use the deflectors and just use foil on the lower grate and/or just the drip pans to provide the heat deflection. If I were doing only 2 pork butts I probably would have skipped the foil and just centered each one over a drip pan and called it a day. My impression from using a BGE is that just because you have a ceramic deflector doesn't mean that the heat is even, so I don't know if using the stone deflectors would have made any difference. I could try it one day and may do so. Centering the fire (and my fire setup for this cook) You bring up a good point about centering the fire. I suppose I could have used the basket splitter and just put charcoal in the center. I was (only mildly) concerned about running out of fuel, but doing a full firebox means you can basically go forever. The firebox is kind of an oval shape. Imagine splitting that oval in half. I lit about a grapefruit sized amount of charcoal in the center of each half of the firebox. I was using my thermoworks billows with the rest of the bottom vents shut. The port for the billows is on the right side. Therefore, the right side of the firebox was getting more oxygen. More fire burned on the right side for (I think) the entire duration of the cook based on what the charcoal looked like afterwards. A lot of ash on the right side and not many remnants. Does the mass of the 42 add significantly to the time it takes to heat soak and is that what makes me want a smaller grill? I have no frame of reference on a smaller KK. I basically do exactly what I used to do with my BGE which is pay attention to the quality of the smoke. When the white colored smoke is gone and the grate thermometer is reading approximately where you want, the food can go, especially if you're using a fan controller. And with the KK I don't open the grill at all with pork butts until it's done. If you're grilling and not smoking you don't have to wait for this thing to heat soak if you don't want to. You can just cook on direct heat on the lower grate. TL; DR - I knew what I was getting into when I bought it and I'm totally un-bothered by the time it takes to heat soak. If I had to guess, this thing takes about 60 mins to fully heat soak. For low and slow, I put my food on when the smoke looks right and the grate thermometer is reading right, not necessarily when the grill is fully heat soaked. My wish to use a smaller grill is mainly rooted in that using one of the bigger KKs is a "production". The grates are heavy. If you want to change the configuration of the firebox you have to take all the grates out lift out the firebox fool with the basket splitter maybe empty the old charcoal out before you do that adjust put basket back in the grill put charcoal back in, etc. Configure the grates the way you want them - then.... light the fire. Aside from this I'm also using the cold smoker attachment or some probes or something else - so - there's usually even more setup involved. This seems to be the case (more or less) with either the 32 or the 42, which were the two grills I was considering. Now that I am living with my KK, I still find myself occasionally firing up the BGE because it is simply "less of a production". Also I have cooked with it for a dozen years so I have a lot of things "dialed in". No probes, etc - just go go go. I have 0 regrets about my purchase - but if I can splurge on something again in the next couple three years, I'm getting a 21 or 23 KK for times when I want a little bit simpler KK experience. Once you cook on one of these grills and taste the difference in the food that comes off of it, you really never want to go back. I hope this answers your questions, and again, sorry for the late reply.
  12. Reminds me of one my granddad used to tell about some dude who was caught speeding doing 100 in a 55. Judge in court asks him: didn’t you see the posted speed limit on the signs? Guy says: hell no, at that speed there’s no way I was taking my eyes off the road long enough to read a sign. Judge fines him $100 dollars for contempt of court. My granddad also said the police officer mantra was: “62 will get you through. 63 will get you ME” Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  13. I have a 42 kk and on my last cook of 5 pork butts at 225 on the main grate with my thermoworks billows, the thermometer at the grate was 225 obviously and dome was about 275. This may be the opposite of what you were expecting. On my egg I feel like the dome is lower than the grate temp. On the kk this is certainly going to be true for the lower grate right over the fire but for me cooking indirect on the main grate, the dome always registers higher than the grate. Like c6Bill I do not often do multi-level cooks. I will keep you posted. One day I will do 10 or 12 pork butts and use 2 levels low and slow. I did rotisserie chicken this weekend. The MEATER being so close to the meat showed a huge differential in ambient vs the dome at first, meater registering in the 200s, but toward the end it was dome at about 375, MEATER ambient at about 325 - 345. I had two of them going and one was closer to fire than the other. At these medium-high temps a thermometer on the grate usually gets even closer than that. If dome is 375 sometimes main grate is more like 350 for me after some time. What I have found with the kk is that the longer you keep the lid closed the more the temps converge over time. Heat soak your kk well before starting to cook. I came from a large BGE. Kk far superior in many ways- no regrets. I used my egg yesterday in the rain though. The old friend still does it’s job. It is not that I won’t cook with the kk in the rain, it is that it was going to continue to rain some today and my kk is not underneath a shelter. If it will be done raining before my cook is done so that the heat from the fire keeps the kk dry, I will use it in the rain. Also I just got my kk 3 months ago. Still probably over protective. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  14. I lied earlier - maybe I would fool around with the longways splitter and this sounds like a good way to play around with it. Thanks @Poochie
  15. great tip. I will definitely give this a try.
  16. One idea that popped into my head is something diagonal that you set on the ledge of the firebox on the front of the inside of the kk and has arms that make it lean against the back wall. It would have a little drip catcher at the bottom. Like a diagonal drip pan for lack of a better term. Basically a metal sheet that covers half the width or so over the firebox, with arms that lean against the back, and a triangular pocket at the bottom for drippings. Maybe that would not work because the drippings would be in a tray very close to the firebox. Maybe they would get too hot and burn up and cause the same bad scent issues. But anyway. Might be easy to try something like this with steel rods and foil. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  17. I actually just had the basket splitter in. Fire on the right, chickens on the left. I could try using a full firebox (or fire on the chicken side) and use the heat deflectors. Also I only air dried my birds in the fridge for 5 or 6 hours. Could do that overnight next time. Also I did a consistent temp. 400 at dome. MEATER said about 325 at bird. I could go higher, or crank the fire after I hit a certain temp. Lots of variables to play with. Idk if I am personally interested in a longways basket splitter with the 42. Got enough stuff to store that I rarely use. If I hit success on this one day I will be sure to post it. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  18. First rodeo with the rotisserie on the 42. Only thing I want to improve next time is putting the birds over direct heat: skin not crispy. But still the best chicken we ever had. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  19. planning to use my new roti I got for christmas on the 42 tonight. Got 2 chickens trussed, rubbed, and air drying in the fridge. Just need to figure out how to put this thing on my kk. QQ do I need to take my side tables off to put the roti on? I figure I need to do it on one side, but maybe only one time b/c I need to get the bracket for the roti motor on, but my guess is the side table bracket and the roti bracket can stay on there together indefinitely. anyway. I'll figure it out but any help/advice anyone has would be awesome
  20. I like mine. It is not a super pain. Setting up the KK compared to other grills is a bit of a production. Everything is built so heavy. The basket splitter. Once you are at the level of commitment both time and money wise to cook on a KK, the extra time to mess with the cold smoker doesn’t seem like a lot. Anyway the cold smoker is fairly easy to set up. A couple of tips- the cold smoker comes with a wing nut. I keep that wing nut attached to my grill so that I am not fiddling with the screws when I want to use my cold smoker. Use a torch to light it. I was using my looftlighter but I got just a plain ol bernzomatic multi use propane torch for Christmas. That I just use with a bottle of camp fuel. The thin flame is perfect for lighting the cold smoker and does a way better job than the electric torch for this app. You want to light it on one side until flames are shooting out the other side. Then run the torch on the other side for good measure. Rather than putting my pellets in the microwave I just make sure I use pellets that are stored indoors. I think the biggest difference I have seen so far is that if I use the pellets that are stored in my box outside (even though the box is waterproof I think it is more moist out there). The pellets I got for Christmas are treager brand - probably not the best. But they were fresh and dry and I kept them indoors - and they work flawlessly vs the kingsford hickory pellets I have outside which are actually supposed to be OK pellets. I did not notice a huge amount of build up from the treager pellet even though they are cheap. Anyway if you have dry pellets and light it properly it burns for hours with no messing around after the fact. The mixed results I have had as far as I can tell were related to the dryness of the media and the way I light it. The last time I used it. 4 hours but probably could have gone 6 without touching it based on how much unburned pellets were left. I ran the cold smoker with wood chips once and chips are ok but the chips I have are hickory given to me by arborists from grinding up a tree in my front yard. Even though they have been sitting around for 3 years they are not kiln dried. This is great for flavor but they make a very sticky soot. I would try chips again but not those because I had to clean out the tube. Even after soaking in pbw it was difficult to get the sticky soot off. I don’t think it needs to be perfectly clean but it was the first time I used the thing. Just remember the screen side of the pipe faces down. That was my first mistake with it. Too much ash gets in and clogs the tube if the screen is facing upward. If you have any questions when you get yours ping me and I will help you. I have made all the mistakes at this point. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  21. Lots of matte black too recently. I am not the only new 42 in matte black. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  22. I do have the cold smoker and I am glad I got it. Useful tool. I have used it with both chips and pellets. It works well. I haven’t actually done any cold smoking. Because the cold smoker increases airflow and in the 42 the outlet for it is above the firebox, I have used it only on higher temp cooks to get extra smoke. On 225 cooks I put wood in the firebox with my charcoal. Have not tried a smoke pot yet. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  23. @Mark SurrattAs a recent purchaser, I will outline my story, my decision, and my results. As I use my 42 more and more, I get more perspective. I made my original order back last June. I ordered a 32BB in matte black pebble. As I waited and waited, 2 things happened. 1) I got impatient and wanted to see if I could get a cancellation on the boat ahead of me 2) I had FOMO on making sure I got the biggest grill. The biggest reason for ordering my KK is that I do big cooks of pulled pork. I was doing 2-3 cooks of 2 pork butts in each cook on my Big Green Egg for my brothers in law, which now I can do all at once. I can do 6 butts on the main grate (with room to spare and drip pans underneath) without making 2 layers with the upper grate, which is astounding and awesome. The pic I am providing is featuring 5 but I could easily do 6. I vac seal and freeze BBQ for my brothers-in-law for Christmas to take back home to new york. And I have some other family gatherings, etc where I bring frozen bags and warm them up in the sous vide and they taste almost like they are fresh off the smoker. And I am expanding the stuff I do this technique with. I ended up being successful in acquiring a cancellation in the boat ahead of me and received my KK in November. Here are some observations. A) the 42SBB is not too big. The basket splitter comes standard. You can grill with a small amount of charcoal. With half a basket or less you can run the grill for many hours. Full baskets are a lot of charcoal, but it doesn't burn near as much as you think it is going to. For grilling in particular, You have ample space for all sorts of versatility. The way that the upper and lower grates are split into 3 sections gives you several different ways to set the grill up, which is so handy and cool. B ) after living with the 42, I occasionally find myself wanting a smaller KK or wanting to use my BGE. I think it boils down to how you are going to use it. For me, I love my 42 because I do a lot of grilling and I absolutely adore the extra room that this grill gives me I do several very large smokes every year and it's great to do it all at once rather than in batches I could probably do these large cooks in a 32 very easily as well but I appreciate all the handy extra space. I don't have to fool with the upper grate unless I want to do - what - a dozen pork butts (which I may do one day and I will post pics!). If you are mostly doing one brisket or one pork shoulder and that type of thing and you are doing mostly smoking and not grilling, I would recommend sticking with the 32 or even looking at the 23 ultimate. The reason is that on this pork butt cook that you see in pictures below (yes, they are all perfect and awesome) but - the butts on the right side where there was more fire underneath were slightly hotter than the ones on the left. This is a HUGE nitpick because THIS IS A KK and the results are mind blowing no matter what, but - it is my impression that the temperature consistency is more and more uniform the smaller KK you have. If you are doing smaller amounts of food and you are aiming for absolute utter perfection, I think a smaller KK is the "best tool for the job". That said, do I have any hesitation about smoking small amounts of food in my 42? None whatsoever - and the results are - as I say - mindblowing - just like with any KK. Bottom line: If you grill a lot like I do and you want the absolute most versatile KK in the line, upgrade to the 42. It's so useful to have all the room and you won't regret it, except for the rare occasion where you wish you had a smaller one. At least, that's my take.
×
×
  • Create New...