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Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble

5698k

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5698k last won the day on March 2 2018

5698k had the most liked content!

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About 5698k

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    Senior Member

core_pfieldgroups_99

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    New Orleans

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  1. 5698k

    Holding 225?

    I’m sorry, I didn’t read your post thoroughly. You’re right, the temp shouldn’t climb an additional 10° every time you open it. For 225°, your top vent should barely off the seat. Is it moving slightly when you open? When you light your fire, do you allow the temp to come up slowly? It’s possible the fire is somewhat choked as opposed to having the right lit coal/airflow combination. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  2. 5698k

    Holding 225?

    Don’t worry about a 10° swing.. it’s insignificant. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  3. I typically don’t wrap my briskets, but I believe this would be an exception. Secondly, I believe this is a textbook candidate for dry brining..basically salt it as much as you would under normal circumstances, let it sit uncovered overnight, then season as you care to minus the salt, and cook normally. Sous vide would be another option if you have that capability. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  4. Good deal..this is kind of a common occurrence particularly on newer grills..or owners simply learn to check the doors as a matter of normal maintenance. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  5. Make sure your draft doors haven’t worked open.. otherwise it’s possible you lit too much coal. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  6. Well, dammit. Now pebble people can start saying that their grills cook as well as tiled grills!! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  7. Cooking at your temperatures powered through the stall. Had you cooked at 225° ish, you’d still be cooking, wondering if it’ll be done in time. Neither is right or wrong, there’s simply a big difference in temps significantly higher than 225° as far as cook times. At the lower temp, the stall can last seemingly forever, or it can be somewhat linear. At 250°+, the cooking is quite linear, and the finish time can be fairly well predicted. Great job, I’m sure your guests will wonder how long you’ve been doing this! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  8. I typically use foil, works fine.. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  9. Don’t let anyone tell you differently, KK’s are in a class of their own..your idea to have parties and experiment is the best, find what you like! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  10. The KK is so well insulated, and so efficient, that once it’s heat soaked, at least at lower temperatures, there will be little difference in temperatures in various parts of the grill. I use a guru controller, and regularly the guru and the dome gauge are in sync. Either way, just be consistent.. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  11. Either plan is fine, but you do want to finish early. A brisket wrapped in foil, then a a towel, then a cooler, (FTC), will stay hot for hours. I’ve cooked low/slo, and hot and fast, no real difference in in result. That said, 250°+ is more consistent time wise, because below that, the length of the stall is much less consistent. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  12. 5698k

    Short Ribs

    Keep them whole.. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  13. 5698k

    This Little Pig...

    Yeah, this one is gonna be fun... Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  14. Congratulations! You have now begun the transition to the dark side.. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  15. Congratulations, you’ll soon find that there’s nothing like cooking on a KK! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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