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HokieBen

First Pizza Try... I’m No Mac!!!

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So I just celebrated my 20th anniversary and my wife surprised me with the pizza stone! I was very excited to try it but I’m super novice at pizza vs meats on a grill. She helped me make 4 diff pies tonight with the kids, we had a blast, and 3 out of the 4 were really good. Each got better as the night went on so I’m learning heat soak time for the stone. Anyway, I always see @MacKenzie pizza pics and they look so good that I have a vision and goal I’m after. We have a long way to go though. 

So I’ll be transparent and show you guys the good and bad. First off, I didn’t have the right tools. No pizza spatula so I went with two regular spatulas, you’ll see the result of that decision on pic 3.

The pics from first to the 4th we made, each got better (until the disaster on #3). Learned a ton so I think next pizza night will be another level! I’ll be reading for more tips on this forum as well! Pics below, please don’t laugh too hard at our 3rd one, wrong tools like I said!!!!!!!!

 

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I bet there was none left over.

Pizza always goes down a storm in our house the journey my wife and i had getting the dough right the oven hot arrrg we argued a lot lol

Definitely better than my first attemps

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For years and years I have used this Serious Eats Pizza Recipe.

Basic New York-Style Pizza Dough Recipe

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/07/basic-new-york-style-pizza-dough.html

 

Makes 2 x 10 inch pizzas.

319g bread flour

9.25g sugar

4.9g salt

5g instant yeast

18.2g virgin olive oil     This will vary depending upon the oil you use so perhaps you should use 1.5T

213g lukewarm water

1. Combine flour, sugar, salt, and yeast in bowl of food processor. Pulse 3 to 4 times until incorporated. Add olive oil and water. Run food processor until mixture forms ball that rides around the bowl above the blade, about 15 seconds. Continue processing 15 seconds longer.

2. Transfer dough ball to lightly floured surface and knead once or twice by hand until smooth ball is formed. It should pass the windowpane test. Divide dough into two even parts and place each in a covered quart-sized deli container or in a zipper-lock freezer bag. Place in refrigerator and allow to rise at least 1 day, and up to 5. Remove from refrigerator, shape into balls, and allow to rest at room temperature for at least 2 hours before baking.

 

Notes:

This dough will be sticky, so I pull it and finger press it to fit the size I wanted.

This dough is light and chewy, I love it and so simple and fast to make.

 

 

**********  Recently I've discovered this recipe and like it a lot there is more chew to the dough and I've made it quite a few times.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Roberta’s Pizza Dough

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016230-robertas-pizza-dough?utm_source=sharetools&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=website

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 153 grams 00 flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon)
  • 153 grams all-purpose flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon and 2 teaspoons)
  • 8 grams fine sea salt (1 teaspoon)
  • 2 grams active dry yeast (3/4 teaspoon)
  • 4 grams extra-virgin olive oil (1 teaspoon)

PREPARATION

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine flours and salt.
  2. In a small mixing bowl, stir together 200 grams (a little less than 1 cup) lukewarm tap water, the yeast and the olive oil, then pour it into flour mixture. Knead with your hands until well combined, approximately 3 minutes, then let the mixture rest for 15 minutes.
  3. Knead rested dough for 3 minutes. Cut into 2 equal pieces and shape each into a ball. Place on a heavily floured surface, cover with dampened cloth, and let rest and rise for 3 to 4 hours at room temperature or for 8 to 24 hours in the refrigerator. (If you refrigerate the dough, remove it 30 to 45 minutes before you begin to shape it for pizza.)
  4. To make pizza, place each dough ball on a heavily floured surface and use your fingers to stretch it, then your hands to shape it into rounds or squares. Top and bake at 550F.
Edited by MacKenzie
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9 hours ago, MacKenzie said:

For years and years I have used this Serious Eats Pizza Recipe.

Basic New York-Style Pizza Dough Recipe

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/07/basic-new-york-style-pizza-dough.html

 

Makes 2 x 10 inch pizzas.

319g bread flour

9.25g sugar

4.9g salt

5g instant yeast

18.2g virgin olive oil     This will vary depending upon the oil you use so perhaps you should use 1.5T

213g lukewarm water

1. Combine flour, sugar, salt, and yeast in bowl of food processor. Pulse 3 to 4 times until incorporated. Add olive oil and water. Run food processor until mixture forms ball that rides around the bowl above the blade, about 15 seconds. Continue processing 15 seconds longer.

2. Transfer dough ball to lightly floured surface and knead once or twice by hand until smooth ball is formed. It should pass the windowpane test. Divide dough into two even parts and place each in a covered quart-sized deli container or in a zipper-lock freezer bag. Place in refrigerator and allow to rise at least 1 day, and up to 5. Remove from refrigerator, shape into balls, and allow to rest at room temperature for at least 2 hours before baking.

 

Notes:

This dough will be sticky, so I pull it and finger press it to fit the size I wanted.

This dough is light and chewy, I love it and so simple and fast to make.

 

 

**********  Recently I've discovered this recipe and like it a lot there is more chew to the dough and I've made it quite a few times.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Roberta’s Pizza Dough

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016230-robertas-pizza-dough?utm_source=sharetools&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=website

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 153 grams 00 flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon)
  • 153 grams all-purpose flour (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon and 2 teaspoons)
  • 8 grams fine sea salt (1 teaspoon)
  • 2 grams active dry yeast (3/4 teaspoon)
  • 4 grams extra-virgin olive oil (1 teaspoon)

PREPARATION

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine flours and salt.
  2. In a small mixing bowl, stir together 200 grams (a little less than 1 cup) lukewarm tap water, the yeast and the olive oil, then pour it into flour mixture. Knead with your hands until well combined, approximately 3 minutes, then let the mixture rest for 15 minutes.
  3. Knead rested dough for 3 minutes. Cut into 2 equal pieces and shape each into a ball. Place on a heavily floured surface, cover with dampened cloth, and let rest and rise for 3 to 4 hours at room temperature or for 8 to 24 hours in the refrigerator. (If you refrigerate the dough, remove it 30 to 45 minutes before you begin to shape it for pizza.)
  4. To make pizza, place each dough ball on a heavily floured surface and use your fingers to stretch it, then your hands to shape it into rounds or squares. Top and bake at 550F.

@MacKenzieI got a bit of a pizza bug and was struck by the variety in recipes for the dough (non sourdough). I just saw the difference in salt between your two recipes. Do you find that you can actively taste the difference?

It was something that got me. I would see variation from 2g to 20g with broadly similar measures but I wanted to understand the science or rather the chemistry so I knew how to adjust the variables. I tried a recipe at one point which called for 18g of salt and it was excessive. I knew I needed a level of salt for the chemistry but I didn't know how much to reduce it by and removing it entirely changed the texture and there was a lot less air (bubble formation) in the crust. I did some research and found a book called 'The Neapolitan Pizza. A scientific guide about the artisanal process'. It feels like a dissertation project and was a bit intimidating at first - I hadn't seen a dough extensograph before but the graph showing the variation of mozzarella stringiness as a function of temperature convinced me that the authors had thought about this a lot more than I had.

But going back to the subject of salt, the authors discuss how salt acts on gluten composition and how it affects the second fermentation. Too much salt alters the PH towards alkalinity and contrasts the fermentation activity of the yeast. They prove why you must dissolve the salt completely in water before adding it during mixing. Not a single recipe I've seen even mentions this or explains why it's necessary. While I haven't done Neapolitan pizzas in the KK, there is so much valuable information in the book about making pizza. I'd recommend it to anyone who is looking to improve their pizza skills. 

I'm also looking forward to the Modernist Pizza book as well. I believe it's out next year but delayed as their research (restaurant visits) have been curtailed.

I wouldn't consider myself an expert (although I'm happy with where I've gotten to in terms of results) but thought the books might help others. Amazing how so few ingredients can create so many variables and different outcome. 

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"They prove why you must dissolve the salt completely in water before adding it during mixing. Not a single recipe I've seen even mentions this or explains why it's necessary." Braai-Q, I've never read this before either, interesting. I'm going to try that provided I remember it. LOL I have not noticed excess saltiness with the 8 gms of salt recipe and I'm fairly sensitive to salt.

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2 hours ago, MacKenzie said:

"They prove why you must dissolve the salt completely in water before adding it during mixing. Not a single recipe I've seen even mentions this or explains why it's necessary." Braai-Q, I've never read this before either, interesting. I'm going to try that provided I remember it. LOL I have not noticed excess saltiness with the 8 gms of salt recipe and I'm fairly sensitive to salt.

I remember the time I followed a recipe with what turned out to be too much salt and it's what prompted me to research the ingredients.

If it helps, these were the recommendations from the Neapolitan Pizza book in relation to salt (I just took some notes, but there are all sorts of graphs and diagrams supporting everything they say). 

- 1.5-2% total dough weight should be salt.

- Sodium chloride acts on gluten composition making the dough more compound (less sticky) as gliadin which is a flour protein is less soluble in salt water and more inclined to gluten network formation.

- During leavening, the speed of the secondary fermentation and the development of gas decreases, contributing to the alveolar structure of the finished pizza.

- Too much salt compromises the fermentation activity of the yeast.

- Salt increases the crunchiness and browning of the crust.

Hopefully of interest and use. You'll have to let me know how you get on. 

 

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