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Sir Bill

South East Asian Food on a KK

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Hello @DennisLinkletter

I have been reading with great interest all the posts on the Forum, but wondered why a form of cooker that originated in South East Asia, owned by someone who lives in Indonesia has almost no cooking that originates in Asia on the site? Do you have any examples of regional food that you or locals cook on your KK that you can share?

regards

@Sir Bill

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I just guess that we've never gotten around to putting them here. They are mostly scattered throughout the General Cooking thread. 

One of my favorite SE Asian dished to do on the KK is Satay. Who doesn't love "meat on a stick?" LOL! Just about every culture has their version of it.  Yakitori cooks are also very popular here. A number of KK owners also own Konro's. 

As far as Asian foods in general - I've done Tandoori chicken a lot: as well as Korean Bulgogi ribs, Peking Duck, and Char Siu ribs. If Hawaiian counts - Kalua Pork Roasts. 

Yes, this Forum is pretty much BBQ-centric, but a lot of "world cuisines" are represented, too. African (Tekobo turned us all onto Nigerian Suya Pepper, which is one of my newfound favorites), Moroccan (yes, I've put my tagine on the KK), Middle Eastern, Caribbean (Cuban & Jamaican), South American (the Peruvian green sauce is my newest obsession!). 

If there's a specific dish/recipe that you're looking for, just ask away and I'm sure that someone on here will respond with their take on it. 

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Thank you @tony b for answering. I guess I am trying to understand if there are benefits to owning a KK beyond the American BBQ dishes that use low and slow techniques i.e. non US food that KK excels at? I love Asian food and world cuisines so recognise many of the things that you mention.

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5 hours ago, Sir Bill said:

Hello @DennisLinkletter

I have been reading with great interest all the posts on the Forum, but wondered why a form of cooker that originated in South East Asia, owned by someone who lives in Indonesia has almost no cooking that originates in Asia on the site? Do you have any examples of regional food that you or locals cook on your KK that you can share?

regards

@Sir Bill

I cook a few dishes on the KK which are Asian but they're primarily grilled and interchangeable with a Konro, things like Yakitori, Bulgogi and Tandoori but they're generally distinguished by the marinade I apply and components like Mirin, Soy, Sriracha and spice blends. My experience of Indonesian is limited to Satay and Ayam Bakar (grilled chicken).

Southern Indian Tandoor Lamb Chops with Pomegranate are sublime on the KK. I can also recommend Nasu Dengaku which is miso glazed aubergine/egg plant and the smoke from the charcoal imparts wonderful flavour. I tend to use White Miso for it. If you've never tried it, I'm happy to share a recipe. I've got to write out a recipe for Jamaican Goat Curry for the forum so don't mind adding another to my to do list.

I can't think of anything that is low and slow like a brisket but I reckon you could do a Shichimi Togarashi spice blend rub on a brisket. There are variations to the mix but I think it's more easily bought than made. The link I've embedded is just to give you an idea, I don't think it's as authentic as a Japanese created version.

 

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18 hours ago, Sir Bill said:

I guess I am trying to understand if there are benefits to owning a KK beyond the American BBQ dishes that use low and slow techniques i.e. non US food that KK excels at?

The KK makes an excellent pizza and breadmaking oven. 

Adding the rotisserie option opens up lots of other possibilities, as well. Things like shawarma and porchetta.

The cold smoker attachment lets you do things like smoking fish, cheese, and nuts, as well as making your own bacon! 

The KK is a lot more than just a "low & slow BBQ" grill. 

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On 10/16/2020 at 12:11 AM, Braai-Q said:

Southern Indian Tandoor Lamb Chops with Pomegranate are sublime on the KK. I can also recommend Nasu Dengaku which is miso glazed aubergine/egg plant and the smoke from the charcoal imparts wonderful flavour. I tend to use White Miso for it. If you've never tried it, I'm happy to share a recipe. I've got to write out a recipe for Jamaican Goat Curry for the forum so don't mind adding another to my to do list.

 

Hello @Braai-Q that would be great!

I am still musing what the Kamado BBQ's were designed to cook in Japan/China but the recipes you mention sound delicious.

Edited by Sir Bill
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Hi @Sir Bill.  My limited Google search tells me kamados were originally designed for cooking rice in China and were then adopted by the Japanese.  I have done some Japanese grilling on my KKs and this book is a great reference https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/205426/the-japanese-grill-by-tadashi-ono-and-harris-salat/.  I have not done any Indian dishes on my KK and am loving the options that @Braai-Q described.  Naan in a KK?  Now that sounds great.  

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20 hours ago, Sir Bill said:

 

Hello @Braai-Q that would be great!

I'll dig out a couple of recipes for you Bill and add them to the recipes section. 

20 hours ago, Sir Bill said:

I am still musing what the Kamado BBQ's were designed to cook in Japan/China but the recipes you mention sound delicious.

There is a book called 'Hot Coals - A User's Guide to Mastering Your Kamado Grill' where they dedicate the first chapter to the history of the Kamado. It might be what you're looking for. Here's the chapter introduction:

“To better understand the configuration and workings of the kamado, it is important to take a closer look at its history. We weren’t satisfied with the version of its history as told by many websites and manuals of modern kamado brands. These often consisted of a vague reference to a Chinese cooking device dating from the Qin dynasty, followed by a glowing story about the founder of the brand in question. We went on a quest, looking for kamado references in books on culinary history and cooking techniques. We also researched a score of obscure online sources, coming across interesting websites from both Japan and the United States.”

There are a good 40 pages dedicated to the subject going from fire to modern times - Dennis gets a couple of pages where the KK is described as:

“This design led to the Komodo Kamado, the ne plus ultra of the kamado world. The Komodo Kamado cannot be moved without heavy machinery and the price is enough to give even the most enthusiastic kamado user pause. However, some of the most world-renowned grilling champions swear by it.”

I'd reproduce more but it's copyright work so need to be respectful of that. I've linked to the US Amazon store for the title but I'm sure you can pick up a copy on ebay, Abebooks or similar.

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1 hour ago, Braai-Q said:

I'll dig out a couple of recipes for you Bill and add them to the recipes section. 

There is a book called 'Hot Coals - A User's Guide to Mastering Your Kamado Grill' where they dedicate the first chapter to the history of the Kamado. It might be what you're looking for. Here's the chapter introduction:

“To better understand the configuration and workings of the kamado, it is important to take a closer look at its history. We weren’t satisfied with the version of its history as told by many websites and manuals of modern kamado brands. These often consisted of a vague reference to a Chinese cooking device dating from the Qin dynasty, followed by a glowing story about the founder of the brand in question. We went on a quest, looking for kamado references in books on culinary history and cooking techniques. We also researched a score of obscure online sources, coming across interesting websites from both Japan and the United States.”

There are a good 40 pages dedicated to the subject going from fire to modern times - Dennis gets a couple of pages where the KK is described as:

“This design led to the Komodo Kamado, the ne plus ultra of the kamado world. The Komodo Kamado cannot be moved without heavy machinery and the price is enough to give even the most enthusiastic kamado user pause. However, some of the most world-renowned grilling champions swear by it.”

I'd reproduce more but it's copyright work so need to be respectful of that. I've linked to the US Amazon store for the title but I'm sure you can pick up a copy on ebay, Abebooks or similar.

Thanks @Braai-Q I found a copy and have ordered it

Edited by Sir Bill
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15 hours ago, tekobo said:

Hi @Sir Bill.  My limited Google search tells me kamados were originally designed for cooking rice in China and were then adopted by the Japanese.  I have done some Japanese grilling on my KKs and this book is a great reference https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/205426/the-japanese-grill-by-tadashi-ono-and-harris-salat/.  I have not done any Indian dishes on my KK and am loving the options that @Braai-Q described.  Naan in a KK?  Now that sounds great.  

I have that book too, great recommendation.

I'm really up for trying Naan in a KK. I've made them in a Puri Tandoor - an Indian friend has one and showed me he does it. I think using the Pizza Steel is the way I'd do it. In a Puri Tandoor, you slap the dough to the sides of the clay walls. I can't see that working on the KK.

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I've always wanted to try Naan in the KK, but was a bit reluctant to start slapping dough on the inside of the lid, even if I did clean it off a bit. You might be on to something using the pizza steel. If you try it, please post to let us know how it works out?

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18 hours ago, Braai-Q said:

There is a book called 'Hot Coals - A User's Guide to Mastering Your Kamado Grill' where they dedicate the first chapter to the history of the Kamado. It might be what you're looking for. Here's the chapter introduction:

 

I'd like a book or two to read before my KK arrives.

I've never done low and slow and have very little experience of using rubs. So something to teach the basics and also recipes which are going to make full use of the KK would be good.

Would you recommend the above for this ? Any other recommendations  ?

Thanks

8 hours ago, Braai-Q said:

I've made them in a Puri Tandoor

Now, those look good !

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10 hours ago, RokDok said:

I'd like a book or two to read before my KK arrives.

I've never done low and slow and have very little experience of using rubs. So something to teach the basics and also recipes which are going to make full use of the KK would be good.

Would you recommend the above for this ? Any other recommendations?

Books are useful for recipes and I have quite a few but if you want to know how to drive the 32, the KK manual should be enough in concert with this forum. Hot Coals is useful and has an interesting historical account of the KK in a depth of detail that I've not seen anywhere else. It's purely focused on the KK. Also take a look at The Essential Kamado Grill Cookbook as another cooker focused book. Under distance selling, you can return in 14 days and Amazon do free returns if you're not satisfied so pick a few and see which works for what you're looking for. In the UK, quite a lot of the titles tend to only be available from Amazon.

Don't discount the value of YouTube as a learning resource, there are a couple of great channels which walk you through the process (although cookers used may vary) of various cooks. Take a look at All Things BBQ for a Texas Style Brisket cook - high quality production values with the advantage of showing you elements of a cook that don't translate in printed form and the meat preparation can be useful as butchers in the UK don't tend to prepare brisket in this way. The first time I ordered brisket, it arrived without any fat on it despite declaring up front it was a 15h slow cook. So I found a good video to share of the meat prep and then the butcher understood. Translation of US/UK butchery terms and cuts can also produce challenges but I've got a decent network of suppliers now so it's much easier. I've also learnt quite a lot of butchery in the process. The Komodo Kamado YT channel is also excellent with Steven Raichlen. I'd suggest his Smoked Brisket Tacos. You can get excellent tacos from Gran Luchito in the UK if you don't want to make them yourself too. There are plenty of other YT BBQ channels but this is a quick starter. I've also learned quite a bit on Amazing Ribs which was started by Meathead Goldwyn. His book offers a 3 month trial access to AmazingRibs.com as well and the forum prides itself on sharing everything 'except our toothbrush'. 

Rubs are pretty straight forward, just ensuring you pick a rub appropriate to the meat you're cooking is key I'd suggest and you might need to lay in supplies of a few items that you might not normally have in your larder. I like Pitt Cue a great deal, it's also a UK book so you're not messing around converting anything which is my frustration with US cookbooks. I don't want to be fiddling with a calculator when I'm prepping. 

I'd recommend getting a digital thermometer as essential kit. Whether you get probes and something like a Guru, Fireboard or Meater is something that you can make your mind up on later but you need to be able to accurately determine internal temperatures. I'd recommend Thermapen Classic but there is huge choice out there.

I'd suggest the following books to start you off:

Meathead

Pitt Cue Co: The Cookbook

Project Smoke

Low & Slow

Pitmaster

Myron Mixon's BBQ Rules

Edited by Braai-Q
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@Braai-Q. This is really helpful. Thankyou.

I've flitted around YT, there is so much out there so great to be pointed in the right direction.I like it that the 2 you've linked to above are succinct. I'm very happy with doing the trimming and have got the necessary knives etc.- I look forward to that. I'm on good terms with our local butcher, and shouldn't have much problem getting the cuts that we need and doing the prep at home.

I've had a look at the reviews and descriptions of the books that you've listed - thanks for the links BTW !.

For he time being I've settled on :

 !)The essential Kamado Grill Cookbook - as a kind of basic book to get a feel.

 2) Meathead - He seems to me a bit of a rebel - don't waste good beer on beer can chicken etc. Plus he tells you how not to get fish to stick - Achiiles here - I even wondered whether the rib rack could hold fish vertically. 

 3) Pitt Cue - You like it a lot - and gives me an opportunity to get some of the ingredients for rubs in. It's also been mentioned by @tekobo I think.

That's it for the time being, I need to exercise some self control - I already have a couple of shelves on brewing.

I'm OK for temp probes, but I do like the idea of the MEATER - that can wait though !

Many Thanks,

 

Best 

RD

 

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2 hours ago, RokDok said:

@Braai-Q. This is really helpful. Thankyou.

I've flitted around YT, there is so much out there so great to be pointed in the right direction.I like it that the 2 you've linked to above are succinct. I'm very happy with doing the trimming and have got the necessary knives etc.- I look forward to that. I'm on good terms with our local butcher, and shouldn't have much problem getting the cuts that we need and doing the prep at home.

I've had a look at the reviews and descriptions of the books that you've listed - thanks for the links BTW !.

For he time being I've settled on :

 !)The essential Kamado Grill Cookbook - as a kind of basic book to get a feel.

 2) Meathead - He seems to me a bit of a rebel - don't waste good beer on beer can chicken etc. Plus he tells you how not to get fish to stick - Achiiles here - I even wondered whether the rib rack could hold fish vertically. 

 3) Pitt Cue - You like it a lot - and gives me an opportunity to get some of the ingredients for rubs in. It's also been mentioned by @tekobo I think.

That's it for the time being, I need to exercise some self control - I already have a couple of shelves on brewing.

I'm OK for temp probes, but I do like the idea of the MEATER - that can wait though !

Many Thanks,

 

Best 

RD

 

No probiem, I look forward to seeing the results of your endeavours but I imagine that it's a bit like brewing, you'll get drawn deeper in. 

If there is anything specific, just send me a direct message and I'll share some info out of the books.

You won't be able to use a rib rack for fish. Unless you're doing a whole salmon and slow smoking it perhaps but there are other and easier ways of doing it.

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2 hours ago, tony b said:

Ain't that the truth! :occasion5:

It's the gateway drug for KK ownership !

I'm kicking off the yeast starters for the brews to celebrate the arrival of the KK tomorrow.

Cheers !

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