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Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
jeffshoaf

Non-wood smoke

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I've done pecan shells in the past. Worked pretty good from what I recall. Hard to source - it's been ages since I tried this? 

I've done herbs, too, like rosemary and sage. You have to be a bit careful with them as they can quickly overpower the cook. 

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I’m interested Jeff I how this turns out and what else is used.
I have used macadamia shells successfully. Currently going through old fruit tree cuttings from carambola and acerola cherry. These are twigs really that I cut up.
I guess it would be about ensuring the pits were well dried out.


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The season is upon us, chestnuts are roasting on an open fire and I have always thought of saving those remains for a later use.  Maybe air drying these critters further in preparation for a smoke could be an answer. Leave them natural or add somethin to the mix, it's your decision.   Unless you have a chestnut tree in your yard it wouldn't be cost effective for a source, however this time of year you can find depending upon your geography an abundant source.   

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For peach pits, i was thinking about contacting an orchard that also sells peach products to see what they do with their pits. They're several hours away so i was hoping to get an idea on the feasibility of using them in my KK.

If the pits are relatively fresh, i could dry them in a dehydrator.

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Yes, and a bit of arsenic, too (the actual seed inside the pit). But, from what I read, the cyanide is trace amounts and in a chemical form that reacts with enzymes in your GI tract to convert to actual cyanide. So, my guess is that it would be OK to burn them and not worry about contaminating your food. 

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1 hour ago, tony b said:

Yes, and a bit of arsenic, too (the actual seed inside the pit). But, from what I read, the cyanide is trace amounts and in a chemical form that reacts with enzymes in your GI tract to convert to actual cyanide. So, my guess is that it would be OK to burn them and not worry about contaminating your food. 

There is an ice cream recipe for apricot noyau which involves breaking out the kernel of the apricot, grinding it and infusing milk with the ground kernel.  Not dead yet but I am sure that is because only small amounts are used in the ice cream and it is not my main diet!

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