Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
CeramicChef

Syzygies Smoking Pot

Recommended Posts

On 9/27/2016 at 8:29 AM, HalfSmoke said:

The cold smoker can be used at any temp. Basically, you are generating the smoke externally to the KK by smoldering wood in the cold smoker tube and then forcing the smoke into the chamber via an air pump. Because it isn't adding heat to the cook chamber, you can use it for cold smoking (e.g. cheese, fish), but it also works at high temps as well. You control the smoke intensity.

The smoke pot is also a great innovation, but you probably won't use it above 300 degrees or so because you want the wood inside to smolder, not burst into flames. The smoke pot isn't controllable -- once you place it in the chamber you get what you get until it is done -- and it can't be used for cold smoking because you need a fire underneath it to keep the smoke cranking. These limitations aside, the smoke pot is extremely simple, inexpensive, and produces the highly desirable thin blue smoke we all crave.

So...do you need the smoke pot if you have the cold smoker? Not really, but for only $20 or so it's nice to have around. I can see plenty of times I'll use the smoke pot where I don't want to mess with the cold smoker. For example, an overnight cook where I don't need to control the smoke, but I do want to control the temp using a BBQ guru.

I vote for both.

Yes. The cold smoker sounds to me like the BBQ Guru: One doesn't need either, but if one has either, and doesn't mind the setup, it nails the problem.

I haven't tried the cold smoker yet, though I've been on the verge of buying one. I keep thinking that it doesn't solve any problems for me that I don't already have covered (I don't actually want to cold smoke). On the other hand, for introducing smoke to higher temp cooks where I wouldn't have dared before, or for fresh smoke toward the end of a long cook? I'd believe it if someone told me that the cold smoker makes better brisket, and that alone would be a justification. This is an empirical question...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me the cold smoker was an easy sell because I do like to smoke cheese. But I'm with you on the rest. For low and slow I think the smoke pot covers it very well. For higher temps, if I use smoke I'll often toss a chunk of wood directly on the lump. Yes, the smoke intensity is off the charts, but it isn't on that long. Will take some playing around to see what the advantages are of the cold smoker at these temps.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/30/2016 at 3:10 PM, ckreef said:

Just think instead of smoking pot now we can smoke a pipe. 

Maybe we should put the pot in the pipe before smoking - just sayin ....... 

 

 

 

 

:smt046

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pipe3.jpeg

 

Used the "smoke pipe bomb" the other night with peach wood on a nice tri-tip steak.  Heated the grill up to 300* F.  Put the pipe on top of the coals, installed the cooking grate & the meat.

Again there was no smoke for about 15 minutes................compared to dutch oven pot that started smoking right away.  When the smoke started, it was a nice clear colored smoke.  It didn't last more than 10 -12 minutes but it was the right amount of smoke for the tri-tip.   

The black iron pipe showed no signs of manufacturing oils and burned clean.  Actually started to show some rust on the threads.  Not concerned at all about using it on a regular basis. 

I did stuff it full of wood chips, so it is definitely not something you would use if you wanted prolonged smoke during your cook.  Is perfect for those quick cooks needed a hint of smoke. 

The tri-tip was pulled at 140*F IT and had a nice smokey touch.  Had some cold left overs in a salad the next day where I could really taste the peach smoke.  Still very good smoke flavor . 

Plan on using the smoke pipe a lot for the meats/cooks that don't require much smoke _ FYI

Another Quick Aside...............when I'm standing at the grill while smoking meats, getting covered with and breathing the smoke, I have a hard time tasting the smoke flavor when eating the food.  It isn't until I eat left overs the next day that I can really appreciate the added smoke goodness.  Guess the grill smoke effects my taste buds in the short term.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This newbie tried out the smoke pot for the first time yesterday.  I hadn't been planning to post anything because so much has been said on the subject to date but I feel compelled to do so.  First, because it may be worth summarising all the stuff that you guys have learned and second, because the results were so good!  Here goes.  This is what I learned:

1.  Buy a beat up, second hand pot from eBay.  You don't feel anywhere near as bad when you drill through it.

2.  If at first you find you can't drill through your cast iron pot, get someone with a drill press to do it for you.

3.  Drill max three holes to focus the smoke output.

4.  Choose how you seal the top.  I used a dough ring.  Won't win any baking competitions, but it works and knocks off easily at the end.

5.  Put the pot in directly over your hot coals.  If you can, pre-heat the pot.

Things I still have to learn:

a.  Look out for the blue smoke - I went indoors and didn't see if this was produced.

b.  Find out if I should have used a drip pan above the smoke pot.  

c.  Find out what size smoking lump to use.  I used chips and some may have blocked the holes.  

Now for some pics.

Here is the underside of the pot, with the initial hole The Husband tried to drill in the middle.  He said that is as far as he got, with a new bit, after 3 minutes.  He got our carpenter friend to use his drill press yesterday and it apparently took seconds to drill the other holes.  Carpenter friend happy because he has been promised the left over hardwood from breaking down the KK delivery crates.  He is delighted to have some undefined, foreign wood to play with. ( Note for non US folk: a Le Creuset #18 is the equivalent of a US 2qt pot)

5a521dfb51bae_mTqjFzW1TNGwflfFriJw.thumb.jpg.0f77d93c78017e8613b59b8914e09a99.jpg

The small smoking chips that I used.

LHArZUgFQcGYmooov1DIkg.thumb.jpg.9bd3ec5d86b479706517e114f39945f0.jpg

The outcome after over 5 hours.  It was a 1.8kg piece of pig.  Shoulder I think, but I'd lost the label.  

5a521e0bd8332_wjlhiYUUQe9z9mTg8TXdQ.thumb.jpg.4869a995a186739c89bae4fd1d8f7748.jpg

A delight to smell and behold.  And eat.  

xrJXRECSQYyZkSw1Mlfk2Q.thumb.jpg.d863809933928ac2b5386e0082727e01.jpg

The MEATER readings of the cook.  The big dip in the middle was when I was fiddling with the two racks of ribs I included with the shoulder.  Other than that, I still marvel at how easy it has been to set and control the temps.  I noticed that someone, Ceramic Chef I think, uses the small vent holes  in the second lower damper to manage/set the temp.  I did the same, keeping the main lower damper shut, and found it very easy to reach and hold the temperature.  (Temps in Centigrade)

I took the ribs out after 4 hours and they made a lovely snack while we were waiting for the pulled pork.  A fat 2018 awaits I think.

fullsizeoutput_88c.thumb.jpeg.124a4935053e392e36e71101bb82ee92.jpeg

And my poor dirty smoke pot.  Should clean up OK but wonder if I should have used a drip pan.  

cUrg3sQVQTqYnsn28bFuOw.thumb.jpg.d3c44bd61cd2f27222353cbb87c59d8d.jpg

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first reaction is that I’ve never used chips, only chunks, I wonder if there’s a significant difference. Do you have a pic of the remains of the chips?

Those holes look bigger than mine, 1/16”. Seems like I read that makes a difference too.

Yes on the drip pan, I always use something to catch drippings.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Robert.  I've just been on cleaning duty and, happily, the top of the smoke pot cleaned up nicely.  Do you use a drip pan, even when you are cooking a steak?  Or just when smoking or doing other cooks that just need indirect heat?  I did a thick fore rib steak with the top grate sitting on the fire basket and I found that cooked well but there was some smoke from the dripping fat. 

The Husband warned me that the holes would be bigger than originally planned.  The larger drill bits were on offer at our local DIY store. :-P

I knocked the flour ring into the pan when I finished so there is only a pile of mush in our bin - not a pretty picture.  About half the chips were black and the rest were dark brown. What would you expect to see?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For fast cooks, such as steaks, I don’t use a drip pan. I like to cook steaks really hot, 650°-700°, plus I like the char from the fire kissing the beef, so a drip pan is out of the question. For low/slo’s I always use something.

I would have expected all black/charred, this is what I get every time. The remains look more like lump charcoal when done. I wonder if the chips blocked airflow, preventing the effect.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm.  I did wonder about the chips blocking the holes.  And whether they got hot enough, given I didn't pre-heat the pot.  I have a few sample sized bags of these small chips and so will need to find a way to make them work.  Will try pre-heating next time but not sure how to avoid blockage. Tasted good though, just a little smoky and tender without being mushy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t pre heat, I’m not sure it’s an issue. Can you find chunks the same wood as your chips? Mixing the two might do it.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found that if my cook temp. is under 225F that I don't get near as much action from the smoke pot as I would like. If I read the graph correctly it looks like for most of the cook the temp. was just under that. Robert, have you noticed this or maybe it's just particular to my setup?

Edited by MacKenzie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My target temp was 105C which Google tells me is 221F.  I was above this for most of the time but not far off.  Sounds like you need a little more to get and keep the smoke going.  Options are to get chunks to avoid blockages, put in some sort of a mesh to avoid blockages and increase the heat.  I haven't seen anything that says I can't stick a couple of pieces of char IN the smoke pot.  That could solve my blockage and heat problem.  Given I'd never cooked low and slow in a BBQ before I am pleased with this first go and look forward to more pot smoking.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Putting some char in the pot should do it! Excellent idea!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious - will the charcoal get enough oxygen to actually burn? 

I've never pre-heated my smoker pot. But, I do put it on top of the lit coals as soon as I've convinced that the fires going well. It's generally starting to smoke by the time I'm up to temps and ready to put on the meat. I have observed that I get more smoke production at higher temps - above 275F, but I still can get decent smoke below that. 

Don't fret drippings on the smoker pot; they'll burn off next cook. The only "maintenance" that I do on mine, besides clean off the old flour paste on the lid/rim, is to always check the holes beforehand to make sure that they're not clogged. Mine are much smaller than yours (3/32") and can clog easily; hence, I only use large chunks of wood in mime. The chips and pellets are for the cold smoker attachment. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×