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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/03/2022 in all areas

  1. My first attempt at tandoori chicken and naan on my new KK32. Naan recipe: https://www.recipetineats.com/naan-recipe/#wprm-recipe-container-58510 Heated pizza stone & dome to 550°F, cooked for 1 minute per side. Chicken recipe: https://www.thedeliciouscrescent.com/persian-grilled-chicken-kabobs/ Dome @ 550°F, cooked chicken for ~15min (turn 90° half way through the cook)
    5 points
  2. Snuck in a Monday cook. Short ribs. 3 hrs with pecan and bourbon barrel chunks, 3 hours in a Pinot to braise, 1.5 hours in the cooler to rest. Ribs were from nearby teXga farms in north Georgia. Rub was a riff on meatheads big bad beef rub.
    4 points
  3. this A5 saga (similar to kobe, but from a different prefecture) boneless short rib was the last piece of waygu i made. cooked reverse sear on a weber go anywhere. i think this is good to eat once in a while, but my wife and i prefer chewy gamey old beef cows rubia gallegas. or hanwoo beef from korea. anything with a strong bovine taste really.. i just ordered a chunk of zabuton waygu arriving tomorrow. gonna be slicing steaks and small pieces for yakiniku.
    2 points
  4. Tandoori Chicken and naan on the pizza stone. Link to the post in KK Cooking
    2 points
  5. Your secrets are safe with me, as I don't do ANY social media (other than here). 👍 Thank you for the nice compliments, but that's just what we do here on this Forum - share our love of great food, especially cooked on the KK.
    2 points
  6. crazy rabbit ear on this one.. .
    1 point
  7. Yeah I am looking at the website now (watching videos) and I actually think I'd go for the larger one for a BIG reason.. I love how the larger one folds into a little metal briefcase for easier storage. I wish I had this back in the fall!
    1 point
  8. After months of research and practice with many cooks on lower cuts of meat, I found the perfect method for prime rib that does not involve Sous Vide but gives similar results. That is, perfectly cooked meat edge to edge - no brown bands, excellent crust. Here is the link: https://blog.thermoworks.com/beef/science-of-perfect-prime-rib-roast/ The final cook was performed on a 11 pound, 5 bone, dry aged, Prime, prime rib. I could not afford to screw up this cook! I used a drip pan and the rotisserie basket which the roast fit perfectly. Plus there was no skewer hole in the meat. Anyway, it came out great. Excellent bark, the center was medium rare pink throughout. The ends were medium. The meat was perfect and everyone was extremely pleased. The technique above was the key. The big surprise was the length of time. According to the charts, it was going to be a 4 to 5 hour cook at 225-250. The MEATER probes saved the day - I used all four in this roast. At 1:30 into the cook, it said the roast would be done in an hour!! I was in disbelief! So, I put my faith in the Meater, called everyone, moved Easter dinner up, and pressed on. The roast was done in 2:45 total. I foiled wrapped it loosely in a metal pan and let it rest for roughly 45 minutes. It was still really warm when served. It was absolutely excellent. My wife was supposed to take more pictures buy in the chaos of the day, she/we forgot. Again, the technique above was the key to success. I used straight charcoal, no wood. Just salt, pepper and garlic powder. Was going to baste with oil, butter thyme and rosemary the last two hours, but it cooked to fast! And in retrospect, I am glad I did not. The flavor was perfect with the seasoning as is.
    1 point
  9. @mguerra Not wood anymore - ceramic. No worries about them getting torched and breaking. The deflector is also to help prevent hot coals from leaving the KK, especially if you pull out the draft door for a very high temp sear. I use the @Syzygies smoker pot for long cooks (like the rib cook that I'm doing today.) Short cooks (under 2 hours), I just put the chunks on top of the charcoal in several spots near where I started the fire. The only time that I use the foil pouch is when I'm doing Jerk cooking with real pimento wood pieces, leaves and berries (allspice). The only way to prolong smoke adherence to the food beyond about 140F meat surface temperature is to spritz it with a liquid (apple juice, water, wine, beer, etc.) periodically to give the smoke some cooler surface and moisture to cling to.
    1 point
  10. That deflector was originally designed to protect the wood knob on the bottom vent. They were getting scorched, cracked and breaking off. Dennis is always updating and improving things, so I don't know what the current vents use for knob material, but if it is still wood, probably best to leave that deflector in place.
    1 point
  11. Considering your meat takes on smoke up to 140 degrees and then substantially lessens there in afterwards, I would suggest using a lower temp to conserve your smoking wood vs a higher temp, it simply lasts longer. The second would be the fire basket setup, light "only" one side and place the loaded smoke pot on that side with a couple good size chunks wrapped in Al hidden down below away from the creeping fire. Say a prayer to Smoky the Bear, wear your favorite lucky shirt/sneakers and hope for the best. Let there be smoke!
    1 point
  12. @Dono i assume you rather not spend money on the kk smoke generator, so alternatives would be using a smoke pot, or larger wood chunks for smoking. i use cherry wood the size of toy blocks. this was after 12 hours. still lots of unspent smoking wood @ 250f. if i use wood chips in a foil bag, it would be gone in an hour.. not sure what would happens if you remove that air deflector, but i wouldn't touch it..
    1 point
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