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Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Forrest

Only The Cleanest Smoke...

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Yeah, if you dig deep enough in eBay you can find some older Le Crueset DOs for under $50 with shipping. Wasn't even on my radar when I got mine, which I paid $36 on Amazon with free shipping. 

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2 minutes ago, BOC said:

I’m not nearly as young as Forrest, but I’ll have fun all the same.


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I follow the Peter Pan model, personally! 

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Peach wood homemade charcoal yielded from the modified Syzygies smoking method via the tin foil pouch. Couldn’t be happier with the results. The food is resting tell dinner can’t wait to see how it tastes!
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That's exactly what you want to see - charcoal. Nothing wrong with sticking with the foil pouch method. If you have a longer cook, like a butt or brisket, just make up a 2nd one and toss it on after the 1st one burns out. Remember, your smoke absorption is basically done when the surface temperature of the meat gets to 140F, so you don't need to produce smoke for the entire cook. You can prolong it by spritzing the meat with a liquid to cooldown the surface temp and the wetness gives the smoke something to stick to. I'm a bit too lazy to go out every hour and spritz; plus, you have to be careful not to overdo it or you risk washing off your bark. Counterproductive!

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”You can prolong it by spritzing the meat with a liquid to cooldown the surface temp”

Also every time you open your lid you are letting out precious heat and condensation that the KK does such a good job of retaining. I have a feeling the need to spritz is going to be completely eliminated with my future 21” Supreme.


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That will be the biggest difference you will notice between your current grill and the KK - it's heat retention. Once heat soaked, the KK rebounds very quickly and you're spritzing it so you're adding moisture. I'm not a big fan of the spritz. I just usually let it rock naturally. I get plenty of smoke infusion in my cooks without it. The old BBQ sayin' - "If you're looking, you're not cooking!" really doesn't apply to a KK, unless you get stupid about it and are opening it every few minutes. 

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Another demonstration of the KKs heat and moisture retention: when i was smoking Boston butts in my pre-KK BGEs, I did it with the fat side up so the melting fat could baste the meat and keep it moist, but with the KK, this results in pulled pork that's a bit greasy. Fat side down in the KK gives moist and tender non-greasy results.

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On 2/20/2021 at 11:14 AM, BOC said:


I thought the same tony b. Tekobo rocking a Ferrari in the demolition derby. I’m not mad at you though tekobo, can’t say I wouldn’t want one.

Wow this thread is cracking me up. Thanks for all the love. 3 holes 1/8" each was a spontaneous choice, though in hindsight seems close enough. I have the first 2 quart smoke pot, and I'm sure it was $20 at some drug store. Crime of opportunity.

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Fat side down in the KK gives moist and tender non-greasy results.

I’m more of a take the fat cap off kind of guy. More smoke, more bark, and Boston Butt’s have plenty of intramuscular fat anyways. The whole fat up bastes your meat thing is mostly a myth. If you place some pieces of fat just above the coals they will drip down burn off and give your food good flavor.


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12 hours ago, Forrest said:


I’m more of a take the fat cap off kind of guy. More smoke, more bark, and Boston Butt’s have plenty of intramuscular fat anyways. The whole fat up bastes your meat thing is mostly a myth. If you place some pieces of fat just above the coals they will drip down burn off and give your food good flavor.

Agreed. I've tried fat cap up, fat cap down, thin cap, thick cap, and every other possible variation over dozens and dozens of cooks. For me, fat cap completely off is the hands down winner. I can't get enough of the delicious bark.

I normally wrap between 4-5 hours, which doesn't leave a lot of time for a fat cap to render much, or for the meat to become excessively dry. I've gone back and forth for years, and prefer the wrap.

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3 hours ago, egmiii said:

I normally wrap between 4-5 hours, which doesn't leave a lot of time for a fat cap to render much, or for the meat to become excessively dry. I've gone back and forth for years, and prefer the wrap.

I tend to wrap briskets more than butts, but I target the wrap after clearing the stall (~170F IT). I'm a Franklin technique guy - pink butcher paper for the wrap. It breathes and promotes a better bark than foil. 

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31 minutes ago, tony b said:

I target the wrap after clearing the stall (~170F IT).

I'm definitely a peach paper guy as well for brisket. Out of curiosity why do you wrap after the stall? I know some wrap at 160 and others at 170-185.

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I'm also a Franklin, wrap your brisket after the stall kinda guy. Primary reason is that the stall is due to evaporative cooling, meaning there is liquid on the surface, meaning that the bark is probably not set yet. After the stall is roughly equivalent to "the bark is set" so wrapping won't damage the bark.

Edited by Pequod
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In the past I use to wrap my  small chunks in aluminum with good results, and then there were times I didn't think this method was providing enough clean smoke so I simply switched to larger chunks alone. Before my KK reaches saturation I throw a couple of chunks on the top and let them coast up to temp, I make sure the coals are glowing and before the meat is placed on, the smoke is blue. I own an offset and manage a fire for clear smoke, the essentials for clean smoke are, an established hot coal bed, a good air supply/ consistent flowing draft, dry wood and size of wood, any added wood should be well caught in flame before closing the door and if a bit of off smoke is seen it generally fades into a blue or clear again. In a Kamado the volume of air is constricted slowing the process right down. This is why chunks are added in early, prior to putting the meat on. The balance between fire, heat, timing and good smoke is in the method.  Blue smoke will eventually come to any piece you place on the coals, the answer lies starting a bit earlier and preparing for it. Use dry dense wood, it provides a longer smoke duration

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