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Jon B.

Coco-Char Vent Question

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Not have used the coco-char before............so I recently started mixing in pieces of coco-char with my normal lump, just to get a feel for how it burns and handles for re-lighting. 

Last night I did a rib cook with mostly coco-char.   I found that I needed to open my vents a little more than normal (compared to using all lump) to reach the temp I wanted to cook at.   

Was it just this one cook or has anyone else experienced this to be true???

Thanks!!!!!

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Haven't alot of experience as some Jon with coco char but I believe part of the trouble is making sure it's lit well. A Mapp torch is recommended or an established fire. I did use a bit with my offset in a charcoal basket for jerky and did well since the fire was established on top and burned down into the coco char. That maybe a part to it's use. Fires are temperamental and need coaxing at times as you well know. Opening your vents to reach temp suggests the fire was not quite there yet. 

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It’s so dense, it burns more slowly. Yeah, this sounds normal.


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FYI - I did use some lump in the middle of the coco-char to get the fire started.  Blasted it hard with the mapp torch and then closed the lid.    

The more I think about it....the round pizza tray I was using as a drip pan, filled the inside of the cooker almost edge to edge.  Not a lot of air flow around it.  Plus the cooking grate was packed tight with ribs.  Guessing that contributed to the need to open the vents more.   

Still interested if anyone else changes the vent setting for coco-char????? 

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I can't say I have had to change the vent settings, but to be fair I usually adjust top and bottom as I close in on the final temp. I generally just use the coco for low temp cooks and the top vent setting is in the 1/16th of a turn for around 225°F on mine. Today however I have some leftover coco with new big lump Fugo to grill some skirt steak this afternoon so I I notice any big difference I will post again.

Interesting question.

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I haven't ever used Coco-char but i have used a product that looks similar called Honeybrix. I've noticed that i need to open the vents more too when using those compared to lump.

As the others have said, i think the fuel is a lot more dense and needs more airflow to get it going, i usually put a small pile of lump under the honeybrix to get them going.

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Charcoal always (eventually) burns at the maximum volume for the allowed airflow, regardless of the density of the charcoal.
X air will create X temp.

Btu numbers are created by charcoal weight not volume.

5 lbs softwood charcoal will burn the same time as 5 lbs hardwood charcoal and create the same BTUs.. but the softwood charcoal will appear to be much more charcoal and light much more quickly and "appear" to burn more quickly.

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Charcoal always (eventually) burns at the maximum volume for the allowed airflow, regardless of the density of the charcoal.
X air will create X temp.
Btu numbers are created by charcoal weight not volume.
5 lbs softwood charcoal will burn the same time as 5 lbs hardwood charcoal and create the same BTUs.. but the softwood charcoal will appear to be much more charcoal and light much more quickly and "appear" to burn more quickly.


Thanks Dennis that makes sense, I suppose the moral of the story when using coco-char is to light it earlier and give it time to come up to temps using the same vent settings?


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4 hours ago, alimac23 said:

 


Thanks Dennis that makes sense, I suppose the moral of the story when using coco-char is to light it earlier and give it time to come up to temps using the same vent settings?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Because of it's density it takes more heat/BTU's  to bring the pieces to ignition temps.. just like trying to boil more water in the pot takes longer.
 

I like the technique of lighting small pieces of lump on top and then using a blower to create lots of heat to light the coco char.. 
Some types of coal are so dense they need to use other fuels to ignite them too..

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