Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
bryan

Spatchcocked Turkey

Recommended Posts

It's Meathead, of course it works. I have his book - it's a good read and lots of great tips/recipes, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bit late on this but I did cook a spatchcock turkey for the first time this thanksgiving. It came out fantastic. Temperatures across breast and thighs much more consistent and loved by all. I will be doing it again next year and have done a chicken since that was fantastic. I am still a beer butt chicken guy in my heart. >.jpg46bf66c98d02cb1876b99b2673f88460.jpg
://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170116/1a327588646cdc00c8ca8e648902b357.jpg[/img].jpg[/img]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it worked too well. Comments were that it was the moistest ever. Dry brined for a day, injected with butter, sprayed with olive oil to hold the run. One key item: when salting the skin mix 1/3 baking powder to 2/3 salt. You will never taste the baking powder and the skin will be dry d to perfection.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/16/2017 at 9:21 AM, tquando said:

Well it worked too well. Comments were that it was the moistest ever. Dry brined for a day, injected with butter, sprayed with olive oil to hold the run. One key item: when salting the skin mix 1/3 baking powder to 2/3 salt. You will never taste the baking powder and the skin will be dry d to perfection.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

It works on all poultry - chicken, turkey, duck, etc. One of the secrets to crispy skin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/16/2016 at 9:05 AM, bryan said:

I have done my spatchcocked bird this exact way several times.  It makes the most beautiful gravy we have ever tasted.  I actually add more veggies (some scraps I keep in the freezer instead of tossing them; ie carrot celery, onion trimmings and skins etc) and a little less liquid.  I take a large disposable roasting pan (doubled for sturdiness and safety) put it on the lower rack, put the prepared turkey on the main rack (NOT skin side down and my side dishes on the upper rack, therefore air circulates totally around the bird and cooks evenly.  Wouldn’t be without my wonderful digital thermometers, put one in the breast and the other in the thigh.  I follow Kenji Alt López’s (Serious Eats.com and The Food Lab fame) advice at the proper temperature to cook the meat to which is lower than Meathead’s and never had an undercooked bird, in fact so juicy that I must place the cutting board even with the juice well into a sheet pan to gather all the delicious juices to add them to the gravy.  

Getting ready to start up the KK now, i’ll try to document this cook,  I went a bit crazy when I saw that Wallyworld had butterball turkey’s for $.98/ lb and bought FIVE.  Four are in my freezer and the 12lb guy is dry brining the the refrigerator.  Happy turkey day all!

 

Sharon

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going to spatchcock a 24 lb turkey for Christmas. I usually do chickens indirect on the top grill with the charcoal basket split and fired on the opposite side. Would you do the same for a turkey? Especially one this size or have a full basket on?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just winging it, as I've never cooked a bird that big. I'd go full basket, direct, upper grate, 375F dome, skin side down. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×