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tekobo

KK Bread Making Tips and Tricks

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44 minutes ago, Pequod said:

Sourdough demi baguettes with fresh milled, ancient grain Kamut harvested from a nearby Egyptian tomb.

Smelly old tomb or not, those baguettes look fantastic.  Bravo P.  

Here is my offering for today.  Two of the loaves were made with cooked porridge and almonds. Yummy toasted lightly.  The third loaf included grated old bread, the heavy seeded rye to be precise.  Yet to cut into it but I am interested in what that does for the taste and texture.  

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11 hours ago, Christinelynn said:

No big clunky things on my counters @Wingman505! There is already a toaster oven that drives me absolutely nuts!!  If it fits in the cabinets, we can talk... 

I am totally with you Christine.  My main kitchen counter is kept clear of any permanent fixtures.  I subscribe to @Syzygies (or his wife's!) set up, with more obtrusive items kept in other rooms for use there or brought into the kitchen when needed. It works well and means you have good kit when you need it but you don't have to look at it all the time.  

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Thanks for the reminder about my Pullman tin.  I tried it on one of my seeded loaves.  The result was a less dark and crusty, easy to eat and easy on the eye loaf. It's the one on the left in the second photo.  

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On 5/18/2020 at 4:29 PM, Pequod said:

Sourdough demi baguettes with fresh milled, ancient grain Kamut harvested from a nearby Egyptian tomb.

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Look at that!  I came back to this thread to comment on something that I had learned from @Syzygies.  Had to hunt for the quote and, en route, I saw these pictures of Pequod's.  Not fair.  That looks so good.  Still learning here. 

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On 4/18/2020 at 10:21 AM, Syzygies said:

To give one example of the dozens of issues that a spreadsheet resolves for me: I can change my sourdough starter from 100% hydration to 50% hydration, then back to 80% hydration, without changing the true hydration of my bread recipes. The spreadsheet adjusts for me. I find it mind-boggling how many recipes out there just ignore the hydration of the starter. The authors have no idea what the true hydration is for their recipes.

I  have been doing pretty well with my bread baking.  The loaves rise reliably and folk like the taste.  There was one Tartine No 3 loaf that came out flat as a pancake when I first tried it back in February.  Thought I would try it again last week.  I felt like I was back where I started.  Sticky dough, wouldn't turn out of the banneton easily and it even stuck to the pizza stone in my indoor oven and ripped when I tried to drag it off.  Aaaargh.  It was so bad that I just slipped the loaves straight in the bin.  

Then I remembered Syzygies' comment above about hydration.  The recipe included soaked buckwheat groats and creme fraiche and called for 85% hydration.  Waaaay too much liquid overall.  I tried again the next day, dialling back hydration to 75%.  The perfect loaf.  Not as precise as S's spreadsheet but realising that the author of the cookbook may not have taken into account the variation in the amount of soaking water I might use helped me solve this problem.  And helped to restore The Husband's faith in my breadmaking.    

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15 hours ago, tekobo said:

Look at that!  I came back to this thread to comment on something that I had learned from @Syzygies.  Had to hunt for the quote and, en route, I saw these pictures of Pequod's.  Not fair.  That looks so good.  Still learning here. 

It only looks good because it is. <_<

15 hours ago, tekobo said:

I  have been doing pretty well with my bread baking.  The loaves rise reliably and folk like the taste.  There was one Tartine No 3 loaf that came out flat as a pancake when I first tried it back in February.  Thought I would try it again last week.  I felt like I was back where I started.  Sticky dough, wouldn't turn out of the banneton easily and it even stuck to the pizza stone in my indoor oven and ripped when I tried to drag it off.  Aaaargh.  It was so bad that I just slipped the loaves straight in the bin.  

Then I remembered Syzygies' comment above about hydration.  The recipe included soaked buckwheat groats and creme fraiche and called for 85% hydration.  Waaaay too much liquid overall.  I tried again the next day, dialling back hydration to 75%.  The perfect loaf.  Not as precise as S's spreadsheet but realising that the author of the cookbook may not have taken into account the variation in the amount of soaking water I might use helped me solve this problem.  And helped to restore The Husband's faith in my breadmaking.    

I know I've name dropped my BFF (Bread Friend Forever) Trevor Jay Wilson here before. Summarizing his mantra: Hydration is for squares. Okay...not really. But his point is: hydration is one of the last things you worry about in perfecting a loaf. For most amateurs (me), dough handling is far more important than hydration. His Champlain Sourdough recipe is only 75% hydration, and yet has a beautifully open crumb if you follow his dough handling techniques. 

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13 hours ago, Pequod said:

It only looks good because it is. <_<

Laughed out loud.  

On your BFF, he is indeed good and I learned a lot from watching him. My point was less about chasing hydration and more about realising that I needed to use my brain and not assume that a recipe's author had actually taken into account how I soak, drain and handle the dough at my end.  Soooo many variables with bread and I am the biggest one.  

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4 hours ago, tekobo said:

Laughed out loud.  

On your BFF, he is indeed good and I learned a lot from watching him. My point was less about chasing hydration and more about realising that I needed to use my brain and not assume that a recipe's author had actually taken into account how I soak, drain and handle the dough at my end.  Soooo many variables with bread and I am the biggest one.  

Yes, absolutely. And there are great differences between flours and different brands of the “same” flour (e.g. what we call “bread” flour in the US) in terms of water absorption, protein content, etc. Professionals have the advantage of same ingredients, conditions, recipes, every day. We home bakers will never have that level of practice or repeatability. So...that’s my long winded way of nodding up and down. 

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I keep my starter in the fridge and usually refresh it just once before making up my dough.  This weekend it was about three weeks since the last time I refreshed the starter and so I decided to refresh it three times before making up the dough.  What a difference!   My leaven usually floats but it was soooo beautifully light this time. Danced round the kitchen at the sight of this:

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Yesterday I made the coriander and carraway loaf from Tartine No 3.  Tonight I made a seeded loaf.  Squashed onto the baking stone from my 23, sitting in my 32.  Looking forward to having a lot more room when I pick up @RokDok's extra baking stone for the 32 which he has kindly said that I can have. 

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Cooling.  Looking forward to breakfast tomorrow.

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19 hours ago, tekobo said:

 Looking forward to having a lot more room when I pick up @RokDok's extra baking stone for the 32 which he has kindly said that I can have. 

Haaa - looking forward to you coming over !

Do get some stout-drinking practice in !!

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