Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I've noticed here and on other sites dedicated to the art of cooking outdoors that a lot of folks tend to buy instead of making their sauces and rubs. While I don't really have an issue with this and I usually keep some Bone Suckin' Sauce on hand for "emergencies", it strikes me as a bit odd that folks basically out source a big component of their flavor efforts on a high percentage of all of their cooks seeing that so many of us go overboard on other ingredients, equipment, and techniques.

It's it just for convenience? Not able to match a favorite commercial item? Can't find ingredients? 

Thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some of these companies have put a lot of time and effort into the development if their rubs/sausces that I think it would be rude not to buy them !!!! Well that and I am lazy 😂 

 

But seriously I gave a few that I really like and I just don’t think that I could make better.

 

I use Holy Cow for beef

Bad Byron’s Butt Rub for potk

Pliwbiys Yardbird for chicken 

 

Then I gave Meat Vhurch lemon pepper and Herb&Garlic for veggies and or adding into the things listed above for a little change here and there.

 

Then I also use some rib candy here and there 😁

 

Hope that helps 👍

Edited by C6Bill
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do both, actually. I like to try new stuff for inspiration. I buy sauces because I don't use them that much and it's just easier.

Like others, I have a few favorite rubs that I buy rather than try and reverse engineer them (something that I'm actually pretty good at, if I do say so myself!) Sometimes if I buy something and it turns out to be "MEH," I'll think of a way to add to it or incorporate it with another rub and improve on it. Really, it's just like buying any spice blend - how many folks out there make up their own curry powder? Berbere? Ras El Hanout? Garam Masala?

Like C6Bill, Plowboys Yardbird is a go-to for chicken. Sureshot Sid's Gunpowder for steaks. Dizzy Pig Dizzy Dust for pork. These are just a few of what I routinely stock in my pantry along with preferred spice blends from Spice House, Penzey's and World Spice Market. YMMV

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know people also put a considerable amount of time into advertising making the product attractive, the mind and eye's see the thought brought to you and your immediately pulled into the web, it gets you every time. So is it in the description, the colors, the packaging, the wording (bone sucking sauce), or the size and amount for the dollar vs cost to make if your looking for value. Some people like anticipation, watching and waiting for the ketchup to come out of that darn bottle or simply the excitement of receiving something in mail. Today it's all impulse, taking a chance and hoping it works out for a hundred reasons you dream up for it's use. Could you make it better or do they? Well here's one that's good, you'll have to make it yourself. I found this recipe on a Texas website when
I was searching for covers on the Santa Maria, I made it, tried it and liked it and maybe you will too.  
                                                                BBQ Pork Rub
                          Mix the following ingredients and rub over your pork ribs. Store the leftover rub in a glass jar to use later.
                                                       1/2 cup Garlic Powder
                                                        1/4 cup Brown Sugar
                                                        2 Tbls Salt
                                                         2 Tbls Black Pepper
                                                         2 Tbls Ancho Chile Powder
                                                         1Tbls Ground Thyme
                                                         1Tbls Ground Mexican Oregano   if you don't have it I suppose regular Oregano will suffice, but the                                                              Mexican has an earthy taste more fitting.  Make it your own and add something else, I always do.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have made rubs but I think the guys who make good ones have put a lot of research into it and, hopefully, use good quality ingredients.  I have not bought any for a few years but I am coming to the US at the end of this week and am thinking of stocking up on a few that @tony b sent me samples of: Qnami, Dizzy Pig Cow Lick and Sure Shot Sid's Gunpowder.  Like @Tyrus said, there is the thrill of choosing, ordering and receiving your haul and like @C6Bill said, it plays to the lazy person in all of us.  Pick out a rub, apply, cook, eat.  Sometimes it's nice to have someone else do the work.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most pre made commercial rubs contain MSG. It’s hard to find any without this monosodium glutamate.
It tastes really good, and it tenderises protein to leave it moist and tasty, and I’m pretty sure it’s a preservative…….. but, it gives some people hangover migraines, others a tic, and others it unsettles their sleep. I’m not a fan of MSG.
I know the carcinogenic accusations are unproven.
WHEN I get my bbq’s back, I make my own rubs to avoid MSG, and, given most commercial rubs are also pre salted, I like adding different salts for their various flavours and strengths.
I also love experimenting with different herbs, spices and flavours.
Dry fried cumin is a favourite.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[mention=3378]Basher[/mention], Speaking of getting your BBQs back, what's the status of the remodel?

Jon we are caught in this construction supply chain problem.
I am told we move back in a month…. In time for our summer.
If I knew it would take this long I would have dragged the bbq out of the back yard and bought it with me.
……. I’m building bbq desire…. The new kitchen won’t get used!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, tekobo said:

@tony b sent me samples of: Qnami, Dizzy Pig Cow Lick and Sure Shot Sid's Gunpowder.  Like @Tyrus said, there is the thrill of choosing, ordering and receiving your haul and like @C6Bill said, it plays to the lazy person in all of us.  Pick out a rub, apply, cook, eat.  Sometimes it's nice to have someone else do the work.  

If you like Cow Lick you will probably like Meat Church Holy Cow 👍

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’ve gone both ways. I buy all of my spices from the spice house, and still make some of my own rubs. There are some really good commercially available rubs out there, and I find it difficult to compete. The choices are endless, and when you find one you like, it’s consistent. The commercial ones are always coming up with something different also. Heath Riles, Elk Creek, and Dizzy Pig are some of my favorites.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Never seen either Heath Riles or Elk Creek, Robert. Any specific recommendations? 

MSG is a non-issue for me anymore.  Back in the day, it was because lower-quality Chinese restaurants used tons of it. If a little made the food taste better, then a lot of it would make it taste great! philosophy. That's not the case anymore. It's glutamate, in general, that creates Umami - naturally found in mushrooms, soy sauce. So use a light hand and you should be OK. YMMV

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steven Raichlen had a basic rub in one of his first books that I still use today. Equal parts salt, pepper, sugar and paprika. Over the years I've changed it to half the salt as the other ingredients and it works well on every meat I cook.  I do like to experiment and pick up a few commercial rubs now and then, but I always come back to this one. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steven Raichlen had a basic rub in one of his first books that I still use today. Equal parts salt, pepper, sugar and paprika. Over the years I've changed it to half the salt as the other ingredients and it works well on every meat I cook.  I do like to experiment and pick up a few commercial rubs now and then, but I always come back to this one. 

Equal parts by volume, or weight?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This one is in your neck of the woods Jeff or maybe not, but Nebraska is certainly not a stones throw from my home. Anyhow I found this rub based on your inspiration, I'd call it Steaksauce in a rub. Opening it up it has a reminiscence bouquet of a good passed memory related to something you might have enjoyed years ago. Had some guests over the other day and used this on a Pichana, the result after a rest was a dark puddle of gravy that didn't remain long afterwards because it disappeared on a bread carpet. They make others, a whole line, I was lucky and by accident this one will remain with me for some time. Opening Pandora's box isn't always detrimental, once in a while it works out.

DSCF3833.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Create New...